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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Guys!

I am a newbie to this forum as well as woodworking. I have a question about miter gauge bars and slots. Do people ever simply just route a pathway for the bar, and skip the track? I ask because I wanted to modify an existed miter track on a table that was given to me. I have a Kreg miter guage that I want to install, it is the standard 3/8 and 3/4 width. The slot on my current table will not take it. As a matter of fact, it seems to be the exact dimensions of the bar. I had a hunch and I removed the track, and sure enough, the Kreg bar slides in perfectly.

Is there a reason I shouldn't use the routed slot as is? Should I go ahead and route the slot bigger to add a standard track?

If I route, is it correct to assume the width accuracy is more important than depth? In terms of depth, I can error on the deeper side cause it wouldn't matter that the bar is below the slot, correct?
But the width is important so the bar doesn't wiggle.

Please school me. I will appreciate it very much. Thank you for your time.
 

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Well, I am still a little unclear on what you are trying to do. Are you looking at a sliding track fitting in either a T-track or a miter slot? In the T-track, it is locked in. If you need that capability, it won't be available in a standard miter slot. As far as can you use it? Sure. If anything from a sliver of wood to plywood to aluminum to steel or a T-slot track fits snugly in a 3/4 miter slot you can use it for some application.

I just went to Rockler and looked at the miter gauge.
From their specs:
Fits both standard and T-track slots
It is designed to fit either. You can use it however you need to.

If the routed slot without a track of some sort is adequate for your application, call it good enough. I believe a nice anodized miter slot or T-track slot makes for a cleaner build, but nothing is stopping you from calling it good and using the mitered slot.

You can route both slots one for a t-track and another for a miter slot or even one for a dual track.

As far as error, just plan on doing it right. But, you are right, the width is important in an unfinished/no slot installed application.

Good luck, whatever you decide to do
 

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where's my table saw?
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What table? a router table?

Hello Guys!

I am a newbie to this forum as well as woodworking. I have a question about miter gauge bars and slots. Do people ever simply just route a pathway for the bar, and skip the track? I ask because I wanted to modify an existed miter track on a table that was given to me. I have a Kreg miter guage that I want to install, it is the standard 3/8 and 3/4 width. The slot on my current table will not take it. As a matter of fact, it seems to be the exact dimensions of the bar. I had a hunch and I removed the track, and sure enough, the Kreg bar slides in perfectly.

Is there a reason I shouldn't use the routed slot as is? Should I go ahead and route the slot bigger to add a standard track?

If I route, is it correct to assume the width accuracy is more important than depth? In terms of depth, I can error on the deeper side cause it wouldn't matter that the bar is below the slot, correct?
But the width is important so the bar doesn't wiggle.

Please school me. I will appreciate it very much. Thank you for your time.
If you want to use a Rockler type track in a router table, anodized aluminum, make the slot in the table to fit the track as purchased.

IF ... your miter gauge does NOT fit into the purchased track then you have a problem, and I assume that's why you have posted...? If it's a very snug fit you can do as I have done, file and sand the miter bar slightly to fit the slot in the track. OR you can buy an new miter bar for your existing miter gauge. OR you can buy a new miter gauge with more features and it should fit precisely in the track with no wiggle room. The Incra miter gauges and Grizzly miter gauges have adjustment screws in the bar which allows you to fit the bar precisely into the track. Do NOT alter the track to fit the bar!


I have several table saws and the miter slots are not all exactly the same width, within a few thousands, so I had to file the slots in the table saw just slightly so the miter gauge bar would fit in all the slots. Some of my miter gauges do fit, others did not, so I knew the slots were a bit undersized, but not by very much. If the miter gauage is from a table saw, and it doesn't fit in the anodized track, it's probably the fault of the miter gauge bar being a bit "over size". :frown2:
 
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