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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wanting to make a pedestal similar to this one http://www.bausmanandcompany.com/images/uploaded/6323-44611.jpg

I am fairly new to woodworking and need help on how to make the miter cuts, and fit them together for the main pedestal part of this design.

My question is, after I make the angled miter cuts, how do I secure the 4 sides together without screws? I want this to look seamless, and didn't want to have any end grain showing.

Any tips are welcomed, thanks!
 

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It is hard to tell from the picture, but I think the pedestal is just butt jointed. There would be no end grain in the main vertical section of the pedestal with butt joints. The end grain is at the top.

So I am not sure of the question.

If you are new to woodworking and are trying to make a tall pedestal with mitred sides, I think the "new" and the desired method of construction being complicated are not a good mix.

Mitred sides could have grooves cut in the mitres for splines. Adding more complexity.

The assembly should be glued.

The splines would keep things aligned, use belt clamps to hold together while the glue dries.

You do not state what tools you have available. The mitred construction and splines would be best done with a table saw.
 

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John
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I have the router bit John shows. I think I have only used it once.

I would recommend you still cut the mitre on a table saw. Then take light passes. This puppy is removing a lot of wood.

An extra challenge with this bit is calculating the exact width being lost if you need to end up with the pedestal being an exact finished dimension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cool!

So new, I guess I mean, I've been doing it for a little while, but I'm not advanced. I have a good grasp on most things, but I don't know a lot of proper techniques, like what would be the proper way to make a pedestal like this. I also tend to mis-speak terms, I didnt know the best way to describe the end grain part!

I have a sawstop contractors 10", router, but no router table, and am able to do solid glue ups.

Thanks for the advice on the glue up portion. By butt-jointed, you just mean put the vertical boards together at a 90 degree angle, glue the sides, and then use belt clamps to secure it as an entire stand?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cool!

So new, I guess I mean, I've been doing it for a little while, but I'm not advanced. I have a good grasp on most things, but I don't know a lot of proper techniques, like what would be the proper way to make a pedestal like this. I also tend to mis-speak terms, I didnt know the best way to describe the end grain part!

I have a sawstop contractors 10", router, but no router table, and am able to do solid glue ups.

Thanks for the advice on the glue up portion. By butt-jointed, you just mean put the vertical boards together at a 90 degree angle, and then use belt clamps to secure it as an entire stand?


It is hard to tell from the picture, but I think the pedestal is just butt jointed. There would be no end grain in the main vertical section of the pedestal with butt joints. The end grain is at the top.

So I am not sure of the question.

If you are new to woodworking and are trying to make a tall pedestal with mitred sides, I think the "new" and the desired method of construction being complicated are not a good mix.

Mitred sides could have grooves cut in the mitres for splines. Adding more complexity.

The assembly should be glued.

The splines would keep things aligned, use belt clamps to hold together while the glue dries.

You do not state what tools you have available. The mitred construction and splines would be best done with a table saw.
 

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Yes, I was inferring the side of one piece is butted up to the side of the next piece.

To assist in alignment you could cut a dado the width of the blade x 1/8in deep in the one board, and rout a 1/8in deep dado in the other board.

Dado_example.jpg

You could do this easily with your table saw.

My rule of thumb is to make the depth of the groove = width of the groove. So to use a single pass on the table saw with 1/8in blade I would make it only 1/8in deep.

This is not for strength, just for alignment while gluing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
YES! Thats awesome, I woudnt have thought of that! Thanks for the replies! Any tips on how to keep a straight data on the male board?
 

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Both cuts can be made on the table saw, and both with the wide side facing down.

For the male board, have the blade cutting the left side of the board, with the right side against the fence.

Line the board up to the blade, then move the fence left 1/8in. Have to test the height of cut on a scrap piece.
 

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John
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I have the router bit John shows. I think I have only used it once.

I would recommend you still cut the mitre on a table saw. Then take light passes. This puppy is removing a lot of wood.

An extra challenge with this bit is calculating the exact width being lost if you need to end up with the pedestal being an exact finished dimension.
That bit has a lot of challenges... that's why I agreed with you about doing splines on the table saw. Much easier to do. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, duh, I see it now! Thats a really easy way to do that! Thanks for your help Dave! I posted another question on a different portion of this forum, but I'm also looking for feedback on straight line rips on some rough lumber ive got. Have you used or made a jig for this with a circular saw?
 

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I use a special straight edge clamped to the wood when I need to rip using the circular saw. Typically this is for cutting sheet goods which are wider than my fence capacity.

The straight edge can be considered a jig. Mine is a commercial one, but a piece of plywood ripped on the table saw serves many people.

I used a plywood straight edge for a number of years, then replaced with a big box store cheap aluminium version, and finally upgraded to the present model.

Mine just makes it easier to determine the cut line and has two 50in pieces so easier to store.
 
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