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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used this minwax brushing lacquer, if so can you give your thoughts on it, thx for your time RJ
 

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Wood Snob
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What are you applying it on?

Go like the wind. Sand after the second coat and every coat after that. Don't forget to rub it out on the final coat.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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The Minwax brushing lacquer is the worst one I've used. Lays down nice, looks good but has no durability. Just a drop of water will turn it white, seems to have little solids and the film is soft. A very poor quality lacquer. Go with Deft.
 

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+2 for Deft. Each successive coat dissolves and bonds with the first so sanding between coats is not necessary unless you have a problem with nibs.

BTW....I've been using Deft since 1962. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thx for all your info, I would get deft, but it isn't in my area. I guess I will just use a poly. thx again
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Where are you located? Can you get the watco? I've bought it at Menards.
 

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Wood Snob
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Roger Newby said:
+2 for Deft. Each successive coat dissolves and bonds with the first so sanding between coats is not necessary unless you have a problem with nibs.

BTW....I've been using Deft since 1962. :blink:
The reason to sand between coats is to get a flat smooth finish.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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The Minwax brushing lacquer is just a standard nitrocellulose lacquer that is thinned and has a good amount of retarder thinner in it. Like any other nitrocellulose lacquer it would work fine for some thing and bad for others. Lacquers dry really fast so just quickly apply it with as few strokes as possible and keep moving. If you like working with lacquers I would recommend getting the equipment to spray. It would go so much easier. Keep in mind that nitrocellulose lacquers yellow as they age so if you use one on a light colored wood like maple in about five years will have a yellow cast to it. They are not very water resistant either so if you were to use on a sink cabinet you could expect the finish to fail soon. If you have a project in mind that is medium to dark in color and not exposed to water the finish would last for many years. I have walnut furniture in my house finished 40 years ago with lacquer and it still looks great.
 

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Wood Snob
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CNYWOODS said:
Al why stay with a lacquer ?
Most professionals still regard lacquer as the best all-around finish for wood because it dries fast and is easy to apply. It's a finer finish and what you see as its applied, is what you get. Brings out the best in the beauty of the wood. Isn't plastic. It's durable enough for about anything and can be repaired much easier than poly. It doesn't get rock hard and is more elastic moving with the wood without cracking and chipping. It doesn't look like a thick coat of plastic which chips and is hard to repair without a total resand.

So many projects we build would look so much better if we left the poly on the shelf and tried one of the other finishes. All finishes don't have to resist a tank driven over them. I use a wiping varnish on almost everything, I like to use lacquer and shellac. I've had wiping varnish on all the kitchen tables and never needed any other protection. Part of the success comes from the way it's applied which was taught to me before poly came on the market. It is the best furniture finish and the argument can't be broken when facts are truly taken into consideration.

The best reason to stay with lacquer is because it's not poly. Please give it a rest and try the finer finishes.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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I'm not going to get into it, but do disagree completely. I don't like poly and could careless about lacquer. But by brush in regards to this post he's better off with a poly. Thinned lacquer = many many coats. And even if it was catalized would not be 1/2 as tough as poly water or oil. ( I prefer the water). A catalized urethane or conversion varnish is the way to go. Production shops and your rta cabinet stores use lacquer. Yes it meets the kcm, but just puddle some soda on it for a few minutes. Just my 2 cents. Not getting into it. To each there own.
 

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CNYWOODS said:
I'm not going to get into it, but do disagree completely. I don't like poly and could careless about lacquer. But by brush in regards to this post he's better off with a poly. Thinned lacquer = many many coats. And even if it was catalized would not be 1/2 as tough as poly water or oil. ( I prefer the water). A catalized urethane or conversion varnish is the way to go. Production shops and your rta cabinet stores use lacquer. Yes it meets the kcm, but just puddle some soda on it for a few minutes. Just my 2 cents. Not getting into it. To each there own.
The point 99% of the poly crowd miss is it doesn't have to be tough. I'm not going to get into it, but do disagree completely. A beginner will have far better results and finishes if he never uses poly. Anything but poly because it doesn't look as good as almost every finish sold. How many times do we spill a puddle of soda on a jewelry box or anything except a Formica topped table. No mater how many coats of lacquer you apply. It ends up being one solid coat.

Too bad it seems the only answer always has to be poly. Why not let the OP and all those that don't start out with poly use a better finish and experience a finer side of wood finishing?

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 
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