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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a beginner, sorry. So I need some very specific thickness hardwood that will be placed between 2 glass pieces. I need it to be be between .080-.088". My original thought was to plane some 1/8" down, but have read most planers won't go below 1/4". Is there a good way to do this, or is this something I could buy somewhere?
 

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Trying to picture how the piece needs to be used could help people give good advice. For example you only gave us one dimension of the piece of wood you need to end with.

If it doesn't need to be very large in width maybe a very careful table saw rip could work.

What about a couple layers of hardwood veneer?
 

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I'm a beginner, sorry. So I need some very specific thickness hardwood that will be placed between 2 glass pieces. I need it to be be between .080-.088". My original thought was to plane some 1/8" down, but have read most planers won't go below 1/4". Is there a good way to do this, or is this something I could buy somewhere?
Most planers do have a minimum thickness of 1/4in since thinner material may not be able to avoid flexing under the pressure of the rollers/planer head.

The 0.080 - 0.088in thickness is about 1/12in. Pretty thin.

I have attempted to sand 1/8in strips with my drum sander and a backer board, but found this is also not easy. The wood flexes too much. I had to hold it down with double sided tape, and then it was difficult to remove from the double sided tape without breaking.

What is the desired width? If less than the maximum depth of cut on a table saw you may be able to get the desired thickness by resawing on the table saw.

An alternate, but more costly solution is to glue pieces of veneer together to achieve the desired thickness.
 

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A lot would depend on which hardwood and the condition of planer you try to do this with. It would also help to use longer lengths and not take more than a 1/32" per pass with new sharp blades. If that is still not working well you could laminate the wood to a a scrap piece of wood with spray adhesive or contact cement and then clean the glue off after you have it.

If you have the problem with the planer not lowering below 1/4" you could just put a piece of plywood in there to run it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Trying to picture how the piece needs to be used could help people give good advice. For example you only gave us one dimension of the piece of wood you need to end with.

If it doesn't need to be very large in width maybe a very careful table saw rip could work.

What about a couple layers of hardwood veneer?

I want to end with 12"x24" or 12"x48" sized pieces. I am going to laser cut them after I am done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A lot would depend on which hardwood and the condition of planer you try to do this with. It would also help to use longer lengths and not take more than a 1/32" per pass with new sharp blades. If that is still not working well you could laminate the wood to a a scrap piece of wood with spray adhesive or contact cement and then clean the glue off after you have it.

If you have the problem with the planer not lowering below 1/4" you could just put a piece of plywood in there to run it on.
This is sort of what i was imagining. If I spray adhesive down a 1/8" piece onto a big mdf board and plane it down in a bunch of passes...
 

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I made some 2" wide strips that thin using featherboards and a set of board buddies on my table saw. I had the stock straight and square, then set the fence so the offcut was about .095". I hand sanded out the saw marks and it was pretty consistent.
 

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This may be terrible advice, or great... I don't know, this isn't something I've ever thought about doing.


Veneer hardwood sheets could be glued up to make something close to the desired size. Google searches veneer hardwood around 1/42 inch thickness as the normal. At least gets you in the ballpark of the right size.
 

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This may be terrible advice, or great... I don't know, this isn't something I've ever thought about doing.


Veneer hardwood sheets could be glued up to make something close to the desired size. Google searches veneer hardwood around 1/42 inch thickness as the normal. At least gets you in the ballpark of the right size.
It sounds like a good idea to me. You can also get thicker veneer to begin with. At least it would save a lot of work delaminating it from a backer board and cleaning the adhesive off.

I've never attempted to surface a thin piece as wide as 12". There will be considerable more pull on it that what I'm accustom to. I did surface a loose piece of 2" wide alder in my planer today down to 1/16" and it did fine on top of a piece of 1x4. Maybe an adhesive will keep a wider piece from blowing out. The only way to know is give it a try and see what happens.
 

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I do not know where I saw or read this, but someone had to plane some wood real thin. He ended up making a jig to fit on his 12 inch planner so he could plane the wood real thin. I think he just fixd a board to the bottom of planer, so it would not slide through when he ran the boards he was planning through.
 

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I do not know where I saw or read this, but someone had to plane some wood real thin. He ended up making a jig to fit on his 12 inch planner so he could plane the wood real thin. I think he just fixd a board to the bottom of planer, so it would not slide through when he ran the boards he was planning through.
That was my thought also. The final thickness that he's looking for is between 5/64 and 3/32. I think that most planers would shatter material that thin.

I think that the best solution is try to buy a sheet of veneer to suit your needs.

There are a bunch of other solutions but the magic words, "placed between 2 glass pieces", means that both sides will be seen. I don't think that anything that requires some sort of glue to a substrate will work.

However, a good table saw with a good blade could cut strips that thin about 3" wide. By adjusting the fence for each cut to keep the off fall as the 5/64 piece there would be less of a chance of blow out. It would be easy to glue the pieces into a 12" wide sheet.
 
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I've been struggling with the thin planing problem for a long time. Then I found this tip and it actually works very well. I'm not sure though it would work on a 12" wide pice. On the other hand, as mentioned above, narrow stripes can be glued up to the desired width.
 

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we go to 1/16" often in our shop for laser engraving as well. you are right, the planer won't do it well unless you use a sled. even then the thin wood tends to be lifted by the dust collection vacuum above. we go as thin as possible, usually about 3/16" on planer then finish it often on a wide belt sander. maybe find domesone close with a wbs.
 
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