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Discussion Starter #1
Just got back from the Class at Marc Adams school. We had a great time. If you get a chance to take a class from Micheal Mocho do it. He's a good instructor and a lot of fun. This was just a 2 day class and you can see by the group photo how much we were able to do.
I had been interested in metal spinning for about 15 years and collected a fair amount of literature on it. Made my own tools and then took this class. It was great. They furnished the tools. comparing theirs to mine and using them I see some modifications and some new tools I want to make.
Mike explained the process very cleary and most everone was successful to some degree or another. Some blew up a few pieces but we all learned from the failures.
I look forward to seeing where I can take this medium.
 

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Since you put your first post on the subject up I checked out several videos of the process.
Very interesting to say the least.
Being a musician & playing in bands I knew that cymbals were made of spun brass but I didn't understand the concept.
So what types of metals are conducive to spinning? It seems they would have to be rather soft.
Glad ya had a good time.
..Jon..
 

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Most amatuer spinners use brass, copper, aluminum and pewter. They need to be dead soft when you buy them or you have to anneal them yourself. The copper, and brass may have to be annealed several times during the process. The aluminum works pretty well unless it's a larger form. Then it also can get work hardened and have to be annealed.
Professional spinners spin steels and stainless steel. They just use much larger tools and heavier lathes.
 

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Never thought of METAL spinning. Is there a lot of noise with this type of turning, such as HIGH PITCH SQUEALING?
 

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Only if you screw up. If you push too hard without enough lubricant you get galling. This makes a scraping noise. If you force it too hard after the metal starts to work harden you get sort of a chatter work which makes horrible noises. If you do everything correctly it's nice and quiet..
 
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