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· where's my table saw?
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I often use a fine ball point pen when marking or making layouts. I have both the round lead adjustable pencils from years of drafting and the Pentel series. 05, .07 sizes. If I want a pencil line, I'll use a good old number 2 pencil. I have an electric sharpener close by the bench.
I have never seen this adjustable pencil posted before except possibly here, a long while back. I did buy one and it's pretty nice:
 

· where's my table saw?
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I use mechanical pencils almost exclusively, anymore. I will use the rectangular construction pencils if I'm marking tough wood for rough cutting. Once it's planed, it's plenty smooth for marking with a .07 or a .05. Since all mechanical pencils are junk, I buy the cheap ones (Bic) in a pack of 10 or 12. I keep a .07 in my compass. When I do my working drawings, it's always a .05 and a clear ruler.
 

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Wnt is right... my drafting compass takes 2mm lead.

4H leaves a very light line (hard graphite)
2H is between
HB is darker line/ softer graphite
 

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Egg Spurt
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I use Pentel .05 all the time because the lines are so crisp. I only let out maybe less than a single mm of lead at a time. You might be surprised at how long less than a mm of lead will last once you get used to working with just a tiny bit sticking out from the mechanical pencil tip. Takes a bit of practice not bearing down on it. It's not like you're carving hard maple with pencil lead.. The single biggest issue I have with mechanical pencils is rethreading that tiny hole with extremely fragile graphite. My eyes are no longer built for such foolishness, but somehow I manage after multiple attempts and many broken leads.. LOL
 

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I use Pentel .05 all the time because the lines are so crisp. I only let out maybe less than a single mm of lead at a time. You might be surprised at how long less than a mm of lead will last once you get used to working with just a tiny bit sticking out from the mechanical pencil tip. Takes a bit of practice not bearing down on it. It's not like you're carving hard maple with pencil lead.. The single biggest issue I have with mechanical pencils is rethreading that tiny hole with extremely fragile graphite. My eyes are no longer built for such foolishness, but somehow I manage after multiple attempts and many broken leads.. LOL
Doesn't your pencil have a feeding spot under the eraser?
 

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Pentel P207 for me. The blue one with .7mm lead. Works well with Woodpeckers tools with marking holes. Lines are not too fat and not too skinny.

I also use a fat lead holder, like 4 or 5 mm lead. It helps me draw quick, coarse lines and scribbles to help me remember things like which side I meant to cut or something similar, or simply writing the part name for easier identification later on. Does not leave a physical mark/indentation on the wood like the .7mm leads can.
 

· where's my table saw?
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Years of drafting and mechanical drawing have left me with a collection of round lead holders and sharpeners, and the various leads and the Pentel series of mechanical holders all in .5 thickness, at least those that got carried up to the woodshop. I'm pretty certain there are more in the supply cabinet with all the ellipses and other drafting templates.
Number 2 pencils are still in the box they came in, and the STRIKER lead holder has never seen any use. I never like "carpenters" pencils as they were too thick for my "fine woodworking" requirements. They did fit pretty well behind the ear or under the ball cap though...
I remember Koh-i-nor erasers and they worked real well on the Velum that we used:
Circuit component Font Office supplies Material property Electronic component
 

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Not pencils but .....

My better half buys these to draw on fabric for sewing. Amazon.com: 8 Pieces Heat Erasable Pens for Fabric with 52 Refills Fabric Marking Pens Fabric Markers for Quilting Sewing DIY Dressmaking Fabrics Tailors Chalk (60)

They create a pretty thin line, and the line is erasable with heat.

I decided to try the white on some walnut and was pleasantly surprised at how well it worked. Rubbing with a finger creates enough heat to erase the line.

Curiously however the line doesn't appear when you first draw it. I made a little video of it appearing-- Line Appearing
 

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Egg Spurt
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Doesn't your pencil have a feeding spot under the eraser?
If it does I've never noticed. Could be that I just never learned that trick? Could it be remotely possible that I never knew that was possible? Nahhh! I already know everything there is to know. You're just making this up in a vain attempt to make me feel like a stooge! LOL
Ok..there is a remote possibility that I don't really know everything. It could even be a whole lot more than just remote and sliding into dumbass territory.. LOL
Edit: By golly you are correct and I'm slightly less dumbassish thanks to you. All this time I thought you had to do it the hard way and have super eyeballs and steadier hands than the best brain surgeons!
The dumbassery feeling shall pass I hope..:rolleyes:
The real mystery is how did I make it to 63 and never once know this was possible? It's almost like living all these years without even knowing it's possible to spit on the ground..lol
 
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If it does I've never noticed. Could be that I just never learned that trick? Could it be remotely possible that I never knew that was possible? Nahhh! I already know everything there is to know. You're just making this up in a vain attempt to make me feel like a stooge! LOL
Ok..there is a remote possibility that I don't really know everything. It could even be a whole lot more than just remote and sliding into dumbass territory.. LOL
Edit: By golly you are correct and I'm slightly less dumbassish thanks to you. All this time I thought you had to do it the hard way and have super eyeballs and steadier hands than the best brain surgeons!
The dumbassery feeling shall pass I hope..:rolleyes:
The real mystery is how did I make it to 63 and never once know this was possible? It's almost like living all these years without even knowing it's possible to spit on the ground..lol
I kept waiting for it...and I still laughed when you made it to the punchline!

You sir...you win the internet for today!!!
 

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Okay, as one who has made a living based on my drafting and lettering, here’s my 2-cents:

  1. For woodworking, 2B (soft black) is the right lead.
  2. Nothing less than 0.7mm, 0.9mm preferred due to breakage issues.
  3. One must learn to “roll” the pencil while pulling (never push) a line, because it distributes the wear more evenly around the tip of the lead. That renders the tip of the lead more like a ball point pen in its shape, That helps keep the wear surface of the pencil tip aligned with the centerline (axis) of the writing instrument (tangent), which is key to getting the pencil line where one expects it to land. (Flat spots are not helpful, except in a compass, but those quickly become hopelessly fat)
  4. I generally mark my fences or table tops instead of the wood, and then set stops to control the cuts. I often use paper drywall tape for my story sticks/layout (tape it down to the work surface or work piece), and then one can use whatever lead size you want since the marks are on beautiful white paper.
  5. Pencil sharpening chore: But an electric sharpener and boxes of 2B wood pencils. Then spend 30-seconds sharpening 12 at a time. You’ll always a nice sharp pencil.
  6. Use what FEELS good in your hand!
  7. Use a scribing knife. These create the thinnest and crispiest lines while pre-cutting the wood fibers for less tear out and splintering.
  8. i saved the best for last: I bought this either from Amazon or Lee Valley, it is a 2mm lead holder. It has a sharpener under the red cap. I love it, but one MUST roll it to keep the lead wear even. One great attribute is that there are many different colors and lead hardnesses available, and they can be switched out effortlessly and quickly.
    Rectangle Office supplies Wood Font Ball pen

    I love this thing!
 

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Okay, as one who has made a living based on my drafting and lettering, here’s my 2-cents:

  1. For woodworking, 2B (soft black) is the right lead.
  2. Nothing less than 0.7mm, 0.9mm preferred due to breakage issues.
  3. One must learn to “roll” the pencil while pulling (never push) a line, because it distributes the wear more evenly around the tip of the lead. That renders the tip of the lead more like a ball point pen in its shape, That helps keep the wear surface of the pencil tip aligned with the centerline (axis) of the writing instrument (tangent), which is key to getting the pencil line where one expects it to land. (Flat spots are not helpful, except in a compass, but those quickly become hopelessly fat)
  4. I generally mark my fences or table tops instead of the wood, and then set stops to control the cuts. I often use paper drywall tape for my story sticks/layout (tape it down to the work surface or work piece), and then one can use whatever lead size you want since the marks are on beautiful white paper.
  5. Pencil sharpening chore: But an electric sharpener and boxes of 2B wood pencils. Then spend 30-seconds sharpening 12 at a time. You’ll always a nice sharp pencil.
  6. Use what FEELS good in your hand!
  7. Use a scribing knife. These create the thinnest and crispiest lines while pre-cutting the wood fibers for less tear out and splintering.
  8. i saved the best for last: I bought this either from Amazon or Lee Valley, it is a 2mm lead holder. It has a sharpener under the red cap. I love it, but one MUST roll it to keep the lead wear even. One great attribute is that there are many different colors and lead hardnesses available, and they can be switched out effortlessly and quickly. View attachment 446732
    I love this thing!
Why don't you use your drafting lead holder for 2mm lead? It works with the sharpener you must also have from drafting. They're also easier to "roll" than that contractor's lead holder. Ask me how I know ;)

 
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