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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The glass patio table top shattered due to temperature extremes. I plan to replace it with a 3/8" MDO plywood. The top is roughly 3.5' x 6' and is oval. My options for cutting it are an older low-end jigsaw (which I think will work better to cut the oval) or an older low-end 7-1/4" circular saw.

The MDO will fit into a channel on the table frame.

What is the best blade / technique for cutting the plywood to get the smoothest cut and the least splintering? Would like to do it in a few days, so prefer a blade I can get locally (or if it happens to be one I already have, so much the better).

I think I'll need four sawhorses to give stable support to the MDO while cutting.
 

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Circular saws are for cutting straight lines, very dangerous to try and cut a curve with one. How do you plan on sealing this against moisture?
 

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More teeth per inch is what you want, though some of it depends on the saw. There are blades available that have no tooth set, that also helps with a smooth cut....both criteria make the saw cut more slowly, and you may even break a blade. If the saw has orbital action, it may cut a little cleaner (this is all in reference to the jig saw). Don't go for the metal cutting blades, the packages should have a description of the material the blade is made for. Cut with the work piece face down, that will give the face side the smoothest cut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Circular saws are for cutting straight lines, very dangerous to try and cut a curve with one. How do you plan on sealing this against moisture?
That confirms my thought of using the jig saw. I wasn't thinking about the danger aspect but knew that I probably couldn't do a very accurate cut with it. So far as sealing, I was thinking of a coat of primer, then a good exterior pain on all surfaces and the edges. I'm open for other suggestions.

More teeth per inch is what you want, though some of it depends on the saw. There are blades available that have no tooth set, that also helps with a smooth cut....both criteria make the saw cut more slowly, and you may even break a blade. If the saw has orbital action, it may cut a little cleaner (this is all in reference to the jig saw). Don't go for the metal cutting blades, the packages should have a description of the material the blade is made for.
That helps.

Cut with the work piece face down, that will give the face side the smoothest cut.
I assume you'd want a blade with teeth pointed up? That seems to be the case with most of the blades I have now.

I've read in the past that putting down blue painters tape of the cut can help with splintering, but don't know if that works with a jigsaw or not.
 
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