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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am designing/building a dining room table and have most of my design completed. The table is 44" wide, 72" long, 1 1/2" thick slab table. One of my biggest peeves is when the heads of the table cannot fully push their chairs in. I have looked all over and am having a hard time finding what is the maximum overhang you can extend past the supports at the heads of the table? Here is a picture of the design I am working off of. Thanks for the help!
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I know what you mean, and I'd be the one who would have to sit on the end and wonder where to put my long legs. If it were me I'd probably put the lower crosspiece at the top and on all four sides but not so wide and scrape your legs on as you scoot your chair in. The legs look nice and beefy. Then again I've just changed the design that you were hoping for.
 

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Smart and Cool
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You are asking for the maximum overhang, which relates to the placement of the ends of the base relative to the length of the table top.

But it seems like you want to know the amount of overhang needed for comfortable seating?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You are asking for the maximum overhang, which relates to the placement of the ends of the base relative to the length of the table top.

But it seems like you want to know the amount of overhang needed for comfortable seating?
You are right, and in a sense I am asking both. My real question is what you first identified - what is the maximum distance I can place the ends of the base relative to the length of the table top?
 

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there is no design formula for what you are asking that i know of. for aesthetics, it is normally kept under 10-12". the only problem, other than aesthetics which you will encounter, if you overhang more, is that when someone is getting up and put their weight on the end of the table, the table could tilt/lift. the longer the overhand, the greater mechanical advantage to do so...

a seriously heavy table should minimize that problem.
 

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Smart and Cool
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You are right, and in a sense I am asking both. My real question is what you first identified - what is the maximum distance I can place the ends of the base relative to the length of the table top?
I just went through something similar with my Neighbors on their kitchen remodel, the discussion was related to how much overhang for an island bar, but the measurements are relative here too.

It seems 14"-16" is the typical space to tuck your legs under. If you used 14" in your application that would make your base 44" of the 72", that seems out of proportion for the example you posted, and would seriously limit the amount of space to sit on each side. The options(IMO) are make that table a "headless" setup, only side seating, or find a creative way to redo, or get rid of the cross braces between the legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just went through something similar with my Neighbors on their kitchen remodel, the discussion was related to how much overhang for an island bar, but the measurements are relative here too.

It seems 14"-16" is the typical space to tuck your legs under. If you used 14" in your application that would make your base 44" of the 72", that seems out of proportion for the example you posted, and would seriously limit the amount of space to sit on each side. The options(IMO) are make that table a "headless" setup, only side seating, or find a creative way to redo, or get rid of the cross braces between the legs.
Okay thank you for your thoughts. I am actually thinking about doing something like this (top view), for the legs to see if it would work. Excuse my non-straight lines, just did it quick with my mouse in paint.

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Okay thank you for your thoughts. I am actually thinking about doing something like this (top view), for the legs to see if it would work. Excuse my non-straight lines, just did it quick with my mouse in paint.

(See image, above.)
The angled end grain joints halfway between the table legs and the long stretcher look like weak points to me. Think of how much leverage force there could be on the outside and inside edges of those joints.

What happened to this idea? It looked like a clever, elegant design to me:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/threads/advice-requested.225595/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The angled end grain joints halfway between the table legs and the long stretcher look like weak points to me. Think of how much leverage force there could be on the outside and inside edges of those joints.

What happened to this idea? It looked like a clever, elegant design to me:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/threads/advice-requested.225595/
Great question, and thanks for following/helping again! I did many different tests with y-joints, and ultimately found that to do a y-joint you are typically faced with your lumber being in the "flat" or horizontal position, and I felt it impacted the structural integrity too much. This design, number 8,000, does have those weekpoints. Thinking of using a festool domino for those joints since you won't see them and it will add the strength I think the joints need. Thoughts on that? Again, REALLY appreciate you checking in!
 

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Problem: The table is 72" long. Assuming the table is for 6 (1 on each end and 2 on each side.). If you move the legs inward you will probably be encroaching on some space needed for the 2 people on each side. I think you have to evaluate your daily routine - 4 or 6 people, then figure out how much you should overhang based on who gets inconvenienced the most and how often.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Once you figure out the construction and the design, here's some advice on the overhang:
Factor 1 - How much is the seat front to back length since that will determine how far (maximum) you can push the chairs under the table top.
Factor 2 - How many chairs will fit along the side with the end chair pushed all the way in? I'm guessing only two, if that?
Factor 3 - If you push both side chairs all the way in, how much room/length is left for the end chair to be push in? Maybe that will determine how far under you can push in the end chairs, then that will also be your overhang dimension. A few inches more or less in the overhang will not affect the leverage when normal weight people lean on it to assist their getting up from the chair..... JMO.
There are other factors involved for that calculation, the weight of the far leg assembly, the weight of that portion of the top and the dishes and food and elbows leaning on the top, located away from the "fulcrum" which would be the nearest set of legs to the person leaning on it..... too much for my simple brain to calculate. Yes, it is true the longer the overhang, the greater that leverage facor will be. Will it really matter, I don't think so, but I could be wrong?
 

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................. Thinking of using a festool domino for those joints since you won't see them and it will add the strength I think the joints need. ................
Dominos will add strength, but in my opinion it wont be enough in this situation. people tend to lean on tables with all their strength. Older and heavier people put even more stress on the table when getting up.
 

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Smart and Cool
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Dominos will add strength, but in my opinion it wont be enough in this situation. people tend to lean on tables with all their strength. Older and heavier people put even more stress on the table when getting up.
Many uses for dining room tables, best to build them sturdy... :)
 

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How many people will normally be sitting at this table on a daily basis?

That should be the parameter for where the legs will be placed which is also happens to be the overhang.

Also an commonly forgotten stress is that a table takes a tremendous amount of racking from people pushing off and leaning. These stresses are a lot more than the vertical load of food, dinnerware and elbows.
 

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Mossback
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Mortise and tenon the legs into the top about 1/2" and use a skirt. Let function dictate form.
 

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I just went through something similar with my Neighbors on their kitchen remodel, the discussion was related to how much overhang for an island bar, but the measurements are relative here too.

It seems 14"-16" is the typical space to tuck your legs under. If you used 14" in your application that would make your base 44" of the 72", that seems out of proportion for the example you posted, and would seriously limit the amount of space to sit on each side. The options(IMO) are make that table a "headless" setup, only side seating, or find a creative way to redo, or get rid of the cross braces between the legs.
Most kitchen overhangs are decided on several factors..Not the same on a solid wood top.

Was the island top sold wood?
 

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Bah humbug
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I am designing/building a dining room table and have most of my design completed. The table is 44" wide, 72" long, 1 1/2" thick slab table. One of my biggest peeves is when the heads of the table cannot fully push their chairs in. I have looked all over and am having a hard time finding what is the maximum overhang you can extend past the supports at the heads of the table? Here is a picture of the design I am working off of. Thanks for the help! View attachment 427185
Some of these tables were designed without head of table on the ends.

If your sitting at the table , how much do you need under the table to be close enough?

If it's a thick top just add steel underneath to eliminate cupping, etc.
DI5UDAerRke3S1XvukbTng.jpeg.jpg.932be7a0a8ae03eaf0c301cfef77f09d.jpg
 
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