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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #106 · (Edited)
A learning from the mallet swap, I suggest including your forum ID as well as your full name.

Jean, do you want name and address with the photo email or separate?
Yeah, good call!

The picture should include, forum screen name, name and mailing address.

This will prevent duplication of efforts and confusion as I will forward on the names and addresses to DST.

Thanks, David.
 

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And if anyone has any advise for making a through mortise that is square, straight and has flat insides, I'm all ears (or eyes in this case)
Take a look at this video. The fellow has a creative way to make the mortise - a two piece face assembly. One piece has a dado for the beam and the other piece is a rectangle glued on to complete the face.

http://woodtube.ning.com/video/making-a-simple-marking-gauge

I do not think Firemedic would like his use of small utility knife blade.

I would not recommend using a drill press to install a threaded insert. I do these by hand.
 

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I <3 the smell of sawdust
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A few questions about cutting wheels.

  1. Does Stainless Steel get harder than generic steel when hardened. in other words, if using a washer as a cutting wheel, is SS better?
  2. Does the wheel need to rotate when scoring a board, or is the idea that you can just loosen the screw and rotate it when one spot gets a bit dull? Getting it to be 100% stable and still rotate is a bit of a challenge
  3. How sharp does it need to be? Sharp enough to score hardwoods or sharp like a chisel that actually cuts wood?
I did a test with a standard (soft steel) flat washer. Sharpened and hardened, but while sharp, it's certainly no chisel. But it does leave a nice line in a piece of wood and probably much easier to score wood with than a steel point.

I'm really having fun with this little project. Most of my woodworking experience has been with big things (beds, tables, etc) and stuff that seems to take forever, but almost always for stuff that is needed, but didn't want to purchase because decent quality is too expensive (not that my products are super high quality, but better quality and better materials than cheap store bought). I love a project that only takes a couple of hours and has a really useful and attractive finished product.
 

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A few questions about cutting wheels.

  1. Does Stainless Steel get harder than generic steel when hardened. in other words, if using a washer as a cutting wheel, is SS better?
Too many unknows. Stainless steel comes in many grades, as does what you call generic steel.

Certain grades are harder than others.

It is rare to see any hint of grade in a big box stores selling stainless steel washers.

A few questions about cutting wheels.


  1. Does the wheel need to rotate when scoring a board, or is the idea that you can just loosen the screw and rotate it when one spot gets a bit dull? Getting it to be 100% stable and still rotate is a bit of a challenge.
I think the wheel can be fixed. This is not going to dull as fast as if it were used for cutting. As you state, it can be loosened and rotated.

A few questions about cutting wheels.

  1. How sharp does it need to be? Sharp enough to score hardwoods or sharp like a chisel that actually cuts wood?
The rules said to make a physical mark on the wood, so if it is scoring the wood, it sounds fine. It is still a cut, just a light cut.
 

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I was just thinking the same thing with the EWT round cutter...why not?

As far as depth of scoring or cutting.....
Remember that in most cases, not all, you're going to be cleaning up the score line so it disappears.
The deeper you make that score, the more material you have to remove before it goes away.

That move on the drill press was iffy. I was waiting for than rig to spin around and bust a knuckle.
Don't know if I like that knife blade hanging out there for my clumbsy fingers to grap onto.

But a great video.....he must have seen my scrap pile.
 

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That move on the drill press was iffy. I was waiting for than rig to spin around and bust a knuckle.
Don't know if I like that knife blade hanging out there for my clumbsy fingers to grap onto.

But a great video.....he must have seen my scrap pile.
I would only use a drill press to hold an insert square to the wood while I rotate the chuck by hand. It is crazy to spin it onto the wood. As you mentioned, too easy for this to become a knuckle buster or a projectile. It is also possible for the insert to be askew.

I also do not like his knife selection. I posted mainly so folks could see one solution to create an accurate clean and square mortise.
 

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In History is the Future
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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
Too many unknows. Stainless steel comes in many grades, as does what you call generic steel.

Certain grades are harder than others.

It is rare to see any hint of grade in a big box stores selling stainless steel washers.



I think the wheel can be fixed. This is not going to dull as fast as if it were used for cutting. As you state, it can be loosened and rotated.

I have to second Dave on the SS.

If hardening steel [washer] of unknown carbon content remember it should be case hardened. Heating a quenching mild steel or low carbon steel does not harden it.

I will suggest that you attempt to have the wheel spin, it does perform considerable better if it spins - so long as it does not wobble! It's not in the rules though so I can NOT tell you it has too.
 

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I <3 the smell of sawdust
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Thanks for all the info on hardening, guys.:thumbsup: I decided to scrap the wheel and went with a sharpened and hardened jig saw blade. You can tell right away how much harder and sharper it is than the wheel/washer
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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Dave Paine said:
Post #18 by Chris Curl. French style which was explained in the video to mean a wedge across the beam.

Episode #29: Making a Marking Gauge
Quick question

In this video he heats the steel and quenches in oil to harden. Why can't it be quenched in water and he uses tool steel, does this work with any kind of steel?

Dave The Turning Cowboy
 

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It won't work for any steel, just high carbon steel or tool steel. I've made a couple of cutters from reciprocating saw blades. The first I just shaped and sharpened - it sharpened easily, but still had a lot of spring in it - more than I liked. A second one, I took through the whole process of annealing it to make it easy to work, hardening it, and tempering it. It took a lot longer to sharpen so it is definitely harder and has much less flex than the first one. I used the info from this link: A Woodworkers Guide to Tool Steel and Heat Treating

I don't know the answer to your question on quenching in water vs. oil, but I followed the instructions and quenched in oil for the hardening treatment and in water for the tempering.

EDIT: The following paragraph is incorrect in it's assumptions and should be disregarded. I didn't delete it as others in this thread have referred to it.

On second thought, if I had to guess on the reason for using oil for the hardening quench, I would say it has to do with the speed of cooling. You are heating the steel to a higher temp for hardening and if you quench it in water, the vapor created from the heat will insulate the steel and it won't cool quickly enough. That can happen with oil as well, but it's vapor point is at a much higher temp so the effect is not as drastic.

It reminds me of an experiment the MythBusters did. Dip your hand in water and then quickly dip it in (and out of) a vat of molten lead - no burns! The water vaporizes creating an insulating blanket around your hand. Granted it only insulates for a VERY short period of time, but it does work.
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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trc65 said:
I

It reminds me of an experiment the MythBusters did. Dip your hand in water and then quickly dip it in (and out of) a vat of molten lead - no burns! The water vaporizes creating an insulating blanket around your hand. Granted it only insulates for a VERY short period of time, but it does work.
Think I'd wanna see that one done a few times before I tried it.

Thanks for the other info too.

Dave The Turning Cowboy
 
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