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Discussion Starter #21
Update...
the lady I bought the table from said “... I am happy to fix an issue if you feel like it is a construction issue I am not looking at the table personally so I don't know if it's a construction issue if you would like to bring it in I'm happy to make sure it's not...”

although I’m worried it may fall apart when I take the top off to bring to her and worried all her fix will be is wood filler since that’s what she told me I should do 😞 guess we will see what solution they come up when I bring it to them...
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Boy, there's quite a lot of custom woodworking shops in upstate SC! Many don't seem to have any web site to display their work.
 

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These folks are all correct... the crack formed because of poor workmanship, but we makes mistakes sometimes only we don't usually sell our mistakes for that kind of money! I would return it, and if they are true professionals, they will know where/when/why/how the failure occurred.

Personally, I would have used dowels, as a guide for the two pieces prior to gluing... it helps a great deal to keep the pieces in place when you pour on the clamp pressure. If you don't use the dowels you will see the kind of stresses, that cannot be controlled, and the expansion/contraction of the lumber will eventually force something to give... either the glue (but not if I glued it), or any weakness (especially around knots) will be exploited and one night when things are very quiet you will hear a "pop" that sounds allot like a .22 short. That was your table giving in to the stress it is under because there was no other method of relief within the piece.

I can think of a number of ways to correct the aesthetics, but that would take almost as much time as it would to rebuild the thing from better lumber and factoring in a little stress relief.
 

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Here are two questions that I keep asking myself:

Are the planer marks deliberate? Is the table supposed to look "rustic"? You wouldn't think so, considering the design of the chairs that they sold with it. Personally, I think it is laziness - they did not do a proper job of preparing the surface of the table, but that's a guess.

In addition, I had the same question as @Jim Frye further above. Does the chair quality match the table? Did the same people who built the table build the chairs? My guess is that the chairs were made by someone else, and they resold them to you. Can you post photos of the chair construction?
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Boy, there's quite a lot of custom woodworking shops in upstate SC! Many don't seem to have any web site to display their work.
Here are two questions that I keep asking myself:

Are the planer marks deliberate? Is the table supposed to look "rustic"? You wouldn't think so, considering the design of the chairs that they sold with it. Personally, I think it is laziness - they did not do a proper job of preparing the surface of the table, but that's a guess.

In addition, I had the same question as @Jim Frye further above. Does the chair quality match the table? Did the same people who built the table build the chairs? My guess is that the chairs were made by someone else, and they resold them to you. Can you post photos of the chair construction?
I’m not sure if they meant to do the planer marks to be honest. I didn’t ask for rustic, but I did go pick the stain color. I don’t mind the rustic look although I would have preferred it a little less rustic (no knots and the texture marks).

I did buy the chairs from the same person as I wanted the stain to match. They have chair options to choose from. I’m not sure if they make them or if they just ordered them and then stained them. The chairs are holding up fine.
425160
425161
425162
 

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Those chairs don't appear to have the same build quality as the table, they're much better.

David
The grain is awfully similar to rubber wood (aka
Rubberwood, Plantation Hardwood, Para Rubbertree. Scientific Name: Hevea brasiliensis)
That and the general construction looks like a lot of imported furniture. I would expect those to be imported unfinished chairs, that were finished to match the table.
 

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Bah humbug
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To be far the deal was between the woodworker and the buyer. The table was in question and now your working on the chairs. Giving new fuel towards the buyer against the woodworker isn't fair...

Hate to say it, but if he buyer didn't know what they are buying then a lesson was learned..

All I can say is hire a professional...
 

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All you have to do is wait until summer when humidity in the house goes back up to 90% or so and the cracks will close.


It’s not the buyers job to know how to properly build a piece of furniture, it’s the builders. I think the buyer should be equipped with enough knowledge to make their case as to why they need to return the table and get their money back. It’s obvious the builder can’t fix what he doesn’t know how to build it in the first place.

An amateur with a pocket hole jig and knowledge gleamed from watching a bunch of YouTube videos by others who are clueless that charged you $1600 for something he threw together. He got somebody to pay for something he built so he considers himself a professional.

The builder of the table should return the money and take the loss as a learning experience so that you don’t start trashing him online. He needs to learn how to properly build a table that accounts for wood movement or he needs to get out of the business.
 

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To be far the deal was between the woodworker and the buyer. The table was in question and now your working on the chairs. Giving new fuel towards the buyer against the woodworker isn't fair...

Hate to say it, but if he buyer didn't know what they are buying then a lesson was learned..

All I can say is hire a professional...
The discussion about the chairs was more related to them appearing correctly built vs the table which was not. Imho the chairs are fine.

As to hiring a professional, I'm guessing the builder considers themselves a professional.
 

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To be far the deal was between the woodworker and the buyer. The table was in question and now your working on the chairs. Giving new fuel towards the buyer against the woodworker isn't fair...

Hate to say it, but if he buyer didn't know what they are buying then a lesson was learned..

All I can say is hire a professional...
As dear old grandpa would say, "It is all calculated into the price of an education."

He is also the one that told me, "If you can do better, do it yourself"... also in the price of an education.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
To be far the deal was between the woodworker and the buyer. The table was in question and now your working on the chairs. Giving new fuel towards the buyer against the woodworker isn't fair...

Hate to say it, but if he buyer didn't know what they are buying then a lesson was learned..

All I can say is hire a professional...
I don’t have an issue with the chairs the chairs have been holding up fine. Unfortunately, the only thing I learned is to not trust people who claim to be a professional. They’ve been operating for 4+ years as a business and have made/sold a lot . The furniture looks great when first built (to people that don’t make furniture at least lol)
 

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Mossback
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I don't think that's maple, it looks like box store pine boards that was used as is, with planer marks left in place. Just stain with no finish? They should have used an oil finish or a satin finish to give it some kind of protection. I agree with the above, it was designed to fail, the wood movement was restricted by the plywood and the rigidly affixed breadboard ends. There is no fix that will last other than redesign and rebuild, and it would still be a homemade pine table in the end.
 

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Bah humbug
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I'd guess the wood wasn't dry before it was built or your house is significantly different environment than where the piece was built.
Nobody knows. Only when there is a problem do people start asking question. Sometimes questions w should be ask first, not after the fact.

I wouldn't ask a hobby woodworker or a cabinet maker to make me furniture without seeing plenty of prior work

I've had 25 year cabinet makers apply for furniture positions. They couldn't do it.
 
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