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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a chainsaw and have some maple that came down in the tornados past few days...im going to hack them into bowl blanks...i dont want to wait forever for a finished product...so im wondering...green maple turned to final thickness rightaway...how bad does it warp and crack?
 

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Some ok if turned thin but mostly warp an crack, if it was me I would do my cuts on the trees make the blanks an seal them up, sounds like you have a lot there so take your time
 

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Many people like to turn the wood as green as it can be.

I have not yet tried this. Last fall I got some silver maple pieces from a tree taken down in a storm. Only a few days old. I sealed the pieces for later when I have a chain saw to cut this up.

Green wood has two kinds of water, "free" water which will spin off and get you, the lathe and the tools all soaked and "bound" water which is stored in the cells and evaporates over time.

I am not sure which wood species have the most "free" water, but you would soon find out.

The wood is highly likely to warp after turning, due to different locations have different grain and so dry differently.

Whether it cracks depends on how well the drying is controlled, whether the wood has any pith, whether all heartwood or mix of heart and sap wood, whether the growth rings are consistent, etc. In other words hard to predict.

Since you have the tree, and plenty of "inventory" try turning some and see what happens.

I was at a wood turning demo back in March. The person was turning a blank from a species of pine tree found in the brackish areas of NJ. The piece was about 1 day old Turned like butter. The turner made the bowl down to about 1/8in wall. I asked him if it would warp, he said "Yes, but I consider this part of the character".

I asked if it would crack, he said this species of wood rarely cracked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Many people like to turn the wood as green as it can be.

I have not yet tried this. Last fall I got some silver maple pieces from a tree taken down in a storm. Only a few days old. I sealed the pieces for later when I have a chain saw to cut this up.

Green wood has two kinds of water, "free" water which will spin off and get you, the lathe and the tools all soaked and "bound" water which is stored in the cells and evaporates over time.

I am not sure which wood species have the most "free" water, but you would soon find out.

The wood is highly likely to warp after turning, due to different locations have different grain and so dry differently.

Whether it cracks depends on how well the drying is controlled, whether the wood has any pith, whether all heartwood or mix of heart and sap wood, whether the growth rings are consistent, etc. In other words hard to predict.

Since you have the tree, and plenty of "inventory" try turning some and see what happens.

I was at a wood turning demo back in March. The person was turning a blank from a species of pine tree found in the brackish areas of NJ. The piece was about 1 day old Turned like butter. The turner made the bowl down to about 1/8in wall. I asked him if it would warp, he said "Yes, but I consider this part of the character".

I asked if it would crack, he said this species of wood rarely cracked.
So turn it....and say a prayer...lol
 

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Read up on how wood moves. I would highly suggest John Jordan's video on Wood movement and the Aesthetics of wood. Depending on how you cut it the wood will move differently.
When I want to turn green wood to finish I usually do what's called a natural edge bowl. These will warp of course just like any wood but on Natural edge bowls you just don't notice it much. I turn them to 3/8" wall thickness or less, let them dry a few days and warp. Then I sand the foot so it will sit flat.
There's a lot to learn about turning green wood but it's not bad. David Ellsworth also has some great info on turning in his book.
a really good video is Bill Grumbine's video. He covers everything from cutting the bowl blank to finishing. I like his video because he teaches almost exactly like I do, which is why I haven't made one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Read up on how wood moves. I would highly suggest John Jordan's video on Wood movement and the Aesthetics of wood. Depending on how you cut it the wood will move differently.
When I want to turn green wood to finish I usually do what's called a natural edge bowl. These will warp of course just like any wood but on Natural edge bowls you just don't notice it much. I turn them to 3/8" wall thickness or less, let them dry a few days and warp. Then I sand the foot so it will sit flat.
There's a lot to learn about turning green wood but it's not bad. David Ellsworth also has some great info on turning in his book.
a really good video is Bill Grumbine's video. He covers everything from cutting the bowl blank to finishing. I like his video because he teaches almost exactly like I do, which is why I haven't made one.
Ok thanks..i will look those up..as far as cutting them im cutting both sides of the pith out and going from there.
 
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