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Hi Guys,

I have a problem I have been coming across twice now:
I have finished my second butchers block, made from maple, walnut and cherry, which I sanded down starting with 80 grit all the way up to 240.
Before applying the finish (cold pressed linseed oil) it all looks great, the colour combination forms a nice contrast (pic 1).
However, after applying the oil, the maple starts turning brownish (pic 2), but only on a few areas and i have absolutely no clue on what may have caused this?

Does anyone have an idea on what could have caused this and how i can prevent this from happening in the future? I havent found anything online yet :/

cheers in advance,
Obolus
 

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Nice looking board!

Walnut gets darker with oils which can obscure the figure. If you spray it with water you'll probably see a similar result. Since you're doing cutting boards and are limited on finishes that need to be food safe I don't know of any options. I personally like the dark contrast.

Russ
 

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Hi Guys,

I have a problem I have been coming across twice now:
I have finished my second butchers block, made from maple, walnut and cherry, which I sanded down starting with 80 grit all the way up to 240.
Before applying the finish (cold pressed linseed oil) it all looks great, the colour combination forms a nice contrast (pic 1).
However, after applying the oil, the maple starts turning brownish (pic 2), but only on a few areas and i have absolutely no clue on what may have caused this?

Does anyone have an idea on what could have caused this and how i can prevent this from happening in the future? I havent found anything online yet :/

cheers in advance,
Obolus
Are you cleaning the butcher block before finishing? Are you wiping the oil on? My thought is perhaps ager sanding there is small amounts of wood dust on the butcher block. Perhaps you are wiping residue, or bleeding from the walnut and cherry onto the lighter maple. That is the only issue that comes to mind. Perhaps a thorough cleaning with DNA prior to finishing might eliminate this.
 

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The finish, am I seeing epoxy? If so epoxy is incompatible with linseed oil. You would have to put several coats of an oil based polyurethane on before using epoxy.

If you are just using linseed oil you might try sealing the wood with Zinsser Sealcoat first.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Were the maple pieces all cut from the same piece of stock? I've have maple take finish differently on different pieces of stock. I just finished the inside of a maple case piece made with glued up panels with danish oil and the various boards all took the finish somewhat differently. I didn't care since it was the inside of the carcass and won't be normally seen. Even the same board can vary along its length. How the wood was dried can also cause coloring differences. Today, I was bandsawing a piece of hard maple along the length and I could feel the cut slow down and speed up due to varying hardness in the wood. I always give maple a sealer of 1# shellac prior to applying any coloration or finish to even out the absorption of whatever finish is to be applied. Maple is well known for blotching, hence the use of the sealer. Given the size of the pieces in your project, the differences in coloration may be just blotching.
 
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