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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This build thread may take a while, but I wanted to share it because I'm doing many many things for the first time in this thread and I wanted to share it with you guys. This is a nice small project that I began because I wanted to practice new things but have something tangible at the end.

Here we go!

Nightstands

I needed night stands. I wanted two for balance AND because anything I do to one I have to do to the other, so if something goes well it won't fall into the catergory of "beginners luck."

First off was the cases. One of the central ideas here is to put it together with no visible means of attachment. I assembled both cases with 1/2" red oak ply, glued and brad nailed to shoulder glued and screwed from the inside.



I glued strips of oak to the inside of the case with large holes counter-sunk from behind. The face frames will attach to these so there, again, is no visible means of attachment.



I tested some colors on the tops (which you'll never see). I'm going for the middle color just to the right of the tape.

 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Continuing on...

This is my first real attempt at mortise and tenon joints. I used a pluge router, a stacked dado set, a chisle and a rasp to create them. They would probably earn me a "B-" in shop class.



A dry test fit. The frames are nice and square, thank the Lord! Small problem: I have gaps in some of the joints. I plan on using thin strips of oak to squeeze in there and close the gaps.

 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wanted a solid wood top, but plain oak would be too redundant. I thought a lot about decorative inlays and whatnot when I had an idea... my house is tractor themed, so what if I stick a tractor in it?

I drew this on a scrap piece of 1/4" ply.



Then cut it out on the scroll saw.



Using it as a template, I made a little tractor out of aspen and walnut.



After a few attempts and some foul language, I got it inlayed into some maple.



In case you're wondering, I'm using the 8030 Allis I made a few years ago as inspiration.

 

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Pain in the A$$
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1,904 Posts
You're doing many things I've never tried before. I think I will subscribe for some inspiration!!!! Keep up the great work!!
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks fellas!

Spent a lot of time in the shop yesterday. I will post more pics when I get off duty in the morning...

Yes, I've made two identical tractors and each one will go in the top of each stand.

Art, which tires are you referring? The inlay or the model? The inlay was just a band saw. The model was done by cutting tire halves, then using a round file to do the treads.

So far, we've got:
First cabinet-type build,
First mortise and tenon,
First inlay.

Eventually we'll have:
First drawers,
First raised panel door,
First time using a spray gun.

I will keep you posted!

I encourage all of you to speak up if you see me moving into an area I shouldn't be in. This entire design I'm making up as I go, so please, offer your criticisms if you think I need to improve on something!
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Last night in Paramedic class we started our ECG and Cardiology unit, and I've signed up for my clinical rotations... why do I say that? Because time to work on my project is about to get really short...

On to the pics...

I attached the face frame. This is a temporary attachment... it will come off for the sake of easy finishing.



Minor problem: on one stand, the face frame is too narrow...



What I will probably do is put a style and frame "boarder" on the side. It will hide this defect, and it will dress it up a little.



Built, glued, and screwed two spacers into the cabinet. This is where I attached the drawer slides.



So the case is "done." Today or tomorrow, I hope to start gluing up panels for the doors.

Bobby
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Heres why...

...you want to make sure your mortise and tenons are tight...



I had a massive gap during glue up. Rather than do the right thing, pull it apart, and clean up the tenon a little more, I thought "I'll just use a scrap of wood to close the gap up!" Easy right?

Well, I'm an idiot and didn't realize that thanks to variations in grain pattern, even my "fix" will stick out like a sore thumb.

Let this be a lesson to us all... don't cut corners thinking "Oh, I'll just cover it up later..."

Stupid, stupid, stupid...

Oh well, Live and learn.

Bobby
 

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Old School
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24,017 Posts
...you want to make sure your mortise and tenons are tight...



I had a massive gap during glue up. Rather than do the right thing, pull it apart, and clean up the tenon a little more, I thought "I'll just use a scrap of wood to close the gap up!" Easy right?

Well, I'm an idiot and didn't realize that thanks to variations in grain pattern, even my "fix" will stick out like a sore thumb.

Let this be a lesson to us all... don't cut corners thinking "Oh, I'll just cover it up later..."

Stupid, stupid, stupid...

Oh well, Live and learn.

Bobby
Couldn't that have been clamped up? FWIW...you could have just glued and clamped the FF to the leading cabinet edges. The slides you're using look like ¾ extension (if you'll be happy with that).

The cabinets and color choice look good.







.
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Couldn't that have been clamped up? FWIW...you could have just glued and clamped the FF to the leading cabinet edges. The slides you're using look like ¾ extension (if you'll be happy with that).

The cabinets and color choice look good.









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There were a couple of reasons I didn't just glue and clamp. The way I did was definately harder, but I wanted to be able to remove the face frame when it was time to finish. I'm going to spray an amber dye. The plywood may take an extra coat to match the face frame and I didn't want to bother with taping up the face frame.

Now that I say that, I really can't put a rail on the side to hide my goof... hmm, this one is going to be tricky!

I'm cool with the 3/4 extention slides. My current nightstand has no slides or catch. I constantly pull the darn thing out of the cabinet.
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Got one of the doors done completely today. Turned out well.



And yes, I remembered to size the panel correctly to allow for expansion and contraction. This is all dry fit. I will wait to glue until after I've sanded and all that good stuff.



In the picture, the center panel looks too dark. To my eye, it looks fine. Hopefully I didn't just create a finishing nightmare...
 

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Masterofnone said:
Got one of the doors done completely today. Turned out well.

And yes, I remembered to size the panel correctly to allow for expansion and contraction. This is all dry fit. I will wait to glue until after I've sanded and all that good stuff.

In the picture, the center panel looks too dark. To my eye, it looks fine. Hopefully I didn't just create a finishing nightmare...
How do you like the cmt router bits?
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Remember it's wood not all pieces are the same color that's what makes it wood has a look all it's own
That is true, but IMHO you can also go too different. I saw an oak dresser at the fair one time. The panels he used had various grain patterns, different colors, etc. It stuck out like a sore thumb and looked sloppy to me. If its worth building, it's worth building well.

Notice on the door, I glued up 3 boards. I specifically choose these boards BECAUSE of their color and grain patterns. The center board has narrow grain on the left and wide grain on the right, so I found a board with wide grain and one with narrow grain to help hide my transitions.

So while I agree that yes, it will never be perfect, I think a good piece of furniture has more subtle effects. Like when they cut rails, styles, and drawer fronts all out of the same board. You don't notice it because it's almost perfect.

Mac, as far as the CMT bits go, I like them, but as they are the first set of raised panel bits I've ever owned or even uses, I am not an expert. Had my router had enough power, I'm sure they would have cut to full depth no problem.

Bobby
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well unfortunately not much progress was made yesterday. I got the other door done and went to work on the drawers. I made a box joint jig months ago for my table saw. Well something happened between now and then because I messed up 2 perfectly good pieces of aspen. The tolerances on my saw miter slides have never been stellar so I may end up making box joints some other way. Do I need box joints? No. Do I want box? You better believe it.
 
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