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Not a good idea if you are making a drum sander where the drum is above the table. You will get a very uneven surface. :thumbdown:

The above the table drum sander applies pressure on the wood. If the feed rate is not exactly consistent you will get more sanding in the areas where the drum has more rotations.

I have a Performax 16/32 drum sander and have experienced this issue is the feed belt slips underneath the wood.

If you make a below the table drum sander, like the FlatMaster, this can work, since the drum does not apply pressure on the wood. I have a 30in unit.

A recent thread with a review of a 24in unit.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f24/24-inch-flatmaster-v-drum-sander-58966/

I do not know if the kits are available in the UK.

I would not recommend a FlatMaster drum sander for the thin pieces you need for your instruments.

A normal above the table drum sander can do thin pieces, perhaps 1/8in if you use a sled to hold the wood to prevent the feed belt from touching the drum which will wear out the abrasive on the feed belt in a few seconds. I experienced this issue.
 

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I'm sure you're right in what you say but why does stopping the material being sanded have any influence over the distance being sanding i.e. the distance from table sanding drum? Maybe I have the wrong idea of how this all works.
I know what happens when the wood slows down or stops. If the wood stops, you will get a deep ridge in the wood from the drum.

The drum applies pressure on the piece since the distance between the drum and the table is less than the thickness of the wood for a given pass.

When the wood is moving the drum does not take off all the potential wood from the pass. When the wood stops, the drum is able to take off more of the wood.

Build you drum sander with manual feed and you will observe the situation in a single pass.
 
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