Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,422 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been asked to make a large bushing of sorts. Picture a donut shape with a 7" OD and a 5" ID about 1-1/2" thick made of teak.

finding a piece of teak that thick might be a challenge and I'm thinking that a single thick piece might not be as stable as a laminated piece.

if I laid up four pieces 3/8" thick and alternated the grain 45 degrees or 90 degrees with each ply, would it stay together and be stable?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
I dont know what you are making but I dont see why you couldnt laminate with the grain in same direction.
It should also work on laminating at 90* on something that small. Teak dont seem to expand/contract that much, it is very stable as far as I'm concerned
The important question is "what are you making and what will it be used for?". Indoors or outdoors? Will it be subject to? Continuous water or moisture?

I would think that anyone selling teak would also have it in 6/4.

Some of the above questions, when answered, might change my original statements.

BTW, I looked up the Quickstep 24. Impressive looking boat. I'm sure it also performs well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
Yes you can do it, at least I've done it using 1/4" thick wood each layer at 90° but I don't think the ply thickness will matter.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,827 Posts
I made an object like that years ago for a Morgan OI 41 footer.
it had an oblong shape - it was a bushing/collar that went around the sail mast through the cabin ceiling.
I made it out of mahogany as the bottom part was seen. it had to be in two pieces that butted very tightly and a special fastening device to keep it securely in place. man, I miss working on the big boats !!!

explaining what project you are working on will help a lot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
two pieces with grain at 90' will be much stronger than a one piece.
a seven inch diameter "ring" will be weak along the grain and could easily split.

fyi - a two part epoxy is the recommend glue for teak - between the oil and the silica in the teak, PVC types don't hold well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Yes, you can do that. It will stay flatter if the grain in the outermost layers run in the same orientation. This is usually done with an odd number of layers. You need to use a rigid glue that won't creep under the stress of wood movement in the layers of different grain orientation. Epoxy or resorcinol work best.
If it's just a simple donut, layers at 90 degrees will work ok. A more complex share would benefit from layers at 45 degree orientation. Long ago, light duty gears were made this way using walnut or cherry veneer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,737 Posts
A laminate glue-up ought to have better dimensional stability and toughness than any solid piece, even if you could find one. My only concernis with the rumor that teak is an oily wood and needs washing with acetone to set up the surfaces for epoxy. I have not looked into this but I've read it many times.

Waht say you teak workers?

I have made lots of handles for wood carving crooked knife blades. Glue up of multiple 1/8" layers of rosewood and mahogany.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,422 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Here’s a drawing. It’s basically a round piece with a hole in the center for a stove pipe to pass through. The piece provides both clearance and a level surface in an uneven cabin top.

It’s not for my boat, but for someone else’s. I’ve offered to make it for them. At my local lumber yard, I’d have to buy a piece of 8/4 x 8 x 8 which would cost a lot and I don’t currently have use for the remaining 7 feet. So I though of making a lamination and thought it might be stronger too.
424489
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Lacquer thinner will also work just fine. The idea it to remove any surface oils that might interfere with the Lacquer thinner will also work just fine. The idea it to remove any surface oils that might interfere with the adhesive used. Both lacquer thinner and Acetone will flash off/dry very quickly. I made it a point to never wait more than about 10 minutes after flashing to apply the epoxy. No reason for the 10 minutes thing, never read it anywhere, just a number I settled on because eventually, oils from the teak interior will migrate back out to the area to be glued/epoxied/
 
  • Like
Reactions: Brian T.

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Are you going to be layering or solid teak ot teak ply?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,827 Posts
got it - yes, a few plies of thin material, epoxy then turn it on your lathe then run it through the band saw and call it done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
This can also be done as a 12 sided piece. Glue up the whole thing as if it were on a flat horizontal surface. Then cut the roof angle. Then belt sand it to a round shape. just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
Quickstep, Plywood should always be laid up with an odd number of even thickness's to be the most stable. That being said I would suggest using yonico birds mouth router bit to make a 6 sided or a 12 sided donut. I have used this bit... and it works quite accurately for making a bucket or drum shaped object with a perfect joint. Watch this video...yonico bird mouth router bits - Bing video

PDF Instructions for setting up for 6 and 12 sided use.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Here is another idea If you have a band saw or scroll saw, you can make several donuts. Cut them in Half and make a cut on each piece like a step. Then shove 2 pieces together with the steps facing each other. Then cut small pieces to fit on the steps facing each other and epoxy in place. This will join the 2 halves together kind of like making half laps almost.
Because of the saw kerf, the 2 halves wont fit back together perfectly so you will lose the other/half and effectively making twice as many cuts. You can figure out that part along the way. Build your layers at 90* to each other. Sand the angle required for each layer to give you a parallel to earth/water build-up. With this idea, if it were a mast, it wouldn't have to be removed. In your case it wouldn't matter.
Another question: does the manufacturer of the stove have an optional piece available for this collar?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top