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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I want to look into making some new kitchen cabinet doors. We are going with the "Shaker" style where it's basically a square frame with the flat inset piece. Nothing fancy. They will be painted white.

I'm looking for tip and tricks on the best way to assemble something like this.

I saw this video
where he used dowels to connect the rails and stiles together which looked interesting and seems pretty straight forward.

I also know what I usually see is using a tongue/groove style where the tongue fits into the groove where the inset piece will go. I'm not sure on the best way to make sure everything gets cut the right thickness and and everything when doing this method.
As I'm typing this I just came across this video which does a pretty good job explaining the process. That might work out well.

Any other tips for doing this and not messing it up? :)
 

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There are router bits for use in the router table to make the rails and stiles for shaker doors. If you have a router table it is an easy and quick way to make identical components. These bits CANNOT be used in a hand held router.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are router bits for use in the router table to make the rails and stiles for shaker doors. If you have a router table it is an easy and quick way to make identical components. These bits CANNOT be used in a hand held router.

George
Oh yeah, I forgot to post what I have access to...

I have a router, but not a mountable router table. Then I have table saw and miter saw. I think I'll try the 2nd video's method with some scrap and see how it goes.
 

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You can make tongue and groove joints on a table saw but you need to have the means of surfacing the wood to a uniform thickness. Just a tiny difference in thickness will translate into a too tight or too sloppy joints. If you purchased a tongue and groove router bit set it would make much better joints regardless of any variation in wood thickness.
 
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