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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the planning stages of our bathroom vanity and in the process of deciding what type of wood to use; my wife mentioned that she would really like the center panel to be bead board. Since we are staining the project we have been testing several different species of wood with different stains. So far she likes cherry the most. My problem is, I can’t find cherry bead board locally. I thought about making it, but was wondering if the time was work the investment? Has anyone else made bead board? Or does anyone know of an online supplier that is reasonable?
 

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I made the back of a country hutch with cherry and cut beads into it. I used a craftsman molding head saw blade and it worked out very well. The blade was bought years ago by my Dad but I think they still sell them... so it can be done.
 

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John
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I am in the planning stages of our bathroom vanity and in the process of deciding what type of wood to use; my wife mentioned that she would really like the center panel to be bead board. Since we are staining the project we have been testing several different species of wood with different stains. So far she likes cherry the most. My problem is, I can’t find cherry bead board locally. I thought about making it, but was wondering if the time was work the investment? Has anyone else made bead board? Or does anyone know of an online supplier that is reasonable?
Morning :smile: - I think only you can decide if it is worth the time investment. If it is just for a couple of door panels, it may not be to bad, for an entire wall of wainscoting it could be vastly different.
MLCS has a point cutting round over for less than $20 and there is a pdf link on the page of how to use it here:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...t_groove.html#point_cutting_round_over_anchor

They also sell a wainscoting panel bit set that has v-groove plus beading for $100, also with a pdf link on how to use them, here:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...ts.html#wainscoting_paneling_beadboard_anchor

You will need to scroll down some on both those pages.
Good luck:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Morning :smile: - I think only you can decide if it is worth the time investment. If it is just for a couple of door panels, it may not be to bad, for an entire wall of wainscoting it could be vastly different.
MLCS has a point cutting round over for less than $20 and there is a pdf link on the page of how to use it here:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...t_groove.html#point_cutting_round_over_anchor

They also sell a wainscoting panel bit set that has v-groove plus beading for $100, also with a pdf link on how to use them, here:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...ts.html#wainscoting_paneling_beadboard_anchor

You will need to scroll down some on both those pages.
Good luck:smile:
Have you ever used the point cutting roundover bit? I have a better router table setup than a table saw setup (working on that).

Thanks
 

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Have you ever used the point cutting roundover bit? I have a better router table setup than a table saw setup (working on that).

Thanks
I have used a point cutting bit a long time ago. The nuance with this shape is that the centre speed of the tip is zero so it does not cut very well. You may need multiple passes just to get clean cut of the area close to the bottom of the bead.

Now if only you had a molding plane to clean this up.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=62030&cat=1,41182
 

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Have you ever used the point cutting roundover bit? I have a better router table setup than a table saw setup (working on that).

Thanks
I have used it to put a beading around my kitchen drawer fronts. What Dave said is true though. Where I had some rather tedious sanding to do, I think if run on a router table and making a second "clean-up" pass without changing any settings, it should clean up pretty well. That is conjecture though, I haven't tested that. Beading around drawer fronts is kind of tedious anyway as you have no through cuts.:blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I made the back of a country hutch with cherry and cut beads into it. I used a craftsman molding head saw blade and it worked out very well. The blade was bought years ago by my Dad but I think they still sell them... so it can be done.
Bernie - I like the look you have going with that hutch. I was thinking about your molding head and I might actually have one tucked away somewhere. I inherited a lot of my dads tools and I think he had one, but I never paid much attention to the profiles. I used the 1/2" roundover once it was scary! :eek: I am going to take a look tonight and see what other profiles are in the set. I might already have something... Darn it, now I don't have an excuse to buy another tool.:thumbsup:

Dave - you make a very valid point about the center of the tool not cutting.
 

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I enjoyed your post in response to mine because I'm of the same mind set - my Dad's set has been in my workshop for 12 years and I was afraid of it (it looks scary). Look at the set up - the molding head can only go in one way and it gets locked in by a set screw. It's safe! It's especially safe for this operation because the cutters are under the boards.

I didn't find it very difficult to use. My beaded back is made from cherry flooring boards and devised a logical way of cutting my beads. They are placed at 2 1/2 inch intervals (choose your own spacing). The 1st cut is made 2 1/2 inches into the board + what I have behind the cabinet side (in your case - what will be inside the door frames. For all succeeding cuts, I would add 2 1/2". When I reached my saw's width capacity, I kept the last board on the saw's table and put aside all the other boards. Then I carefully matched my last board's cut to the mold cutters... added 2 1/2 inches to all succeeding cuts.
 

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I made the back of a country hutch with cherry and cut beads into it. I used a craftsman molding head saw blade and it worked out very well. The blade was bought years ago by my Dad but I think they still sell them... so it can be done.
I have and have used this blade on my table saw. It works quite well. You would just have to carefully move the fence after each cut.

The beads would be very close together, not spread as in a "store bought" bead board. You might experiment and try spacing each "set" of beads some space apart. Give it a different look.

George
 
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