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Discussion Starter #1
I want to know about making square or rectangular boxes. is there a way to make them without using combination square (tool) ? Is it an indispensable tool? I still believe there is a way to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Then I can use your square concept with rectangular wooden boxes. The diagonals from corner to corner will be the same though longer. No need for me to say that, but the concept remains the same. This way square or rectangular will always be perpendicular to each other. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I think I understand you. The 3-4-5 method needs computation, but diagonals do not need them; have to do adjust one another until both diagonals are the same. Trial with error. Your method is yet better and faster.
 

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3-4-5 will make the first 90 degree corner. Equal diagonals will make all 4 corners 90 degrees.
There's no computation required at all = if one side is '3' and the other side is '4', then the diagonal must be '5'. = done.
Got a freezer in the basement? Draw lines at 90 degrees on that nice white top for an assembly surface. At least, it gets you close and a clamp of some sort does the rest.

More than a century ago, as the Haida were perfecting the techniques to make kerf bent boxes (at least 10 known different corner geometries), they made pairs of sticks of equal lengths to span the diagonals as the wood cooled. Beautifully square box corners. Go into the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology and study them for your self. Failing that, search the UBC MOA on line collection.
 

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Do you want a square, or is a rectangle ok?

The diagonals trick works to ensure the corners are 90 degrees, but that does not ensure that you have a square.

What kind of joinery are you using?

If you want a square (as opposed to a rectangle) then you need to factor in the way the sides are joined at the corners and adjust the lengths if necessary.
 

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Yes, there are other solutions, however...

Why not just use a combination square or other known accurate square? They are not expensive, readily available AND will save lots of time, whether making/sawing/cutting by hand or machine. The process will be much more enjoyable. :yes:

Look here at Harbor Freight:
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=square
 
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Why not just use a combination square or other known accurate square? They are not expensive, readily available AND will save lots of time, whether making/sawing/cutting by hand or machine. The process will be much more enjoyable. :yes:
Agreed....you should a have a selection of squares anyway.
Big and little for all sized projects.
 

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I want to know about making square or rectangular boxes. is there a way to make them without using combination square (tool) ? Is it an indispensable tool? I still believe there is a way to do it.
What is the real purpose of this question?

There could be different answers depending upon what you are really looking forl

George
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Robson Valley said:
3-4-5 will make the first 90 degree corner. Equal diagonals will make all 4 corners 90 degrees.
There's no computation required at all = if one side is '3' and the other side is '4', then the diagonal must be '5'. = done.
Got a freezer in the basement? Draw lines at 90 degrees on that nice white top for an assembly surface. At least, it gets you close and a clamp of some sort does the rest.

More than a century ago, as the Haida were perfecting the techniques to make kerf bent boxes (at least 10 known different corner geometries), they made pairs of sticks of equal lengths to span the diagonals as the wood cooled. Beautifully square box corners. Go into the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology and study them for your self. Failing that, search the UBC MOA on line collection.
Robson,

I see now. Then I can make four 3-4-5 corners. No or little computation. Then decide what I want square or rectangle for wooden boxes. Wooden boxes can represent tables, beds. Rectangles' length is just longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
GeorgeC said:
What is the real purpose of this question?

There could be different answers depending upon what you are really looking forl

George
Without combination square I ask myself how I can make accurate corners? The replies are 3-4-5 method and diagonals. Good answers.
To answer your question, Now I know that the factories make combination square through 3-4-5 trick. No computation needed.
Now I can go to Harbor Freight buying angles with peace of mind because I can make one myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Chris Curl said:
Do you want a square, or is a rectangle ok?

The diagonals trick works to ensure the corners are 90 degrees, but that does not ensure that you have a square.

What kind of joinery are you using?

If you want a square (as opposed to a rectangle) then you need to factor in the way the sides are joined at the corners and adjust the lengths if necessary.
Pardon me, rectangle. Now I have the concept how to make accurate corners. Then decide what kind of joinery I need. I believe very basic.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
alanskil said:
Wrong posting... I was not able to delete it.


Without combination square I ask myself how I can make accurate corners? The replies are 3-4-5 method and diagonals. Good answers.
To answer your question, Now I know that the factories make combination square through 3-4-5 trick. No computation needed.
Now I can go to Harbor Freight buying different angles with peace of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
alanskil said:
Without combination square I ask myself how I can make accurate corners? The replies are 3-4-5 method and diagonals. Good answers.
To answer your question, Now I know that the factories make combination square through 3-4-5 trick. No computation needed.
Now I can go to Harbor Freight buying angles with peace of mind because now I can make one myself.

This is wrong posting, answering to my reply. but am not able to delete it.
 

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What Frank said above. Square or rectangle, if the opposite sides are EXACTLY the same length, just assemble your box and make the diagonal measurements the same.

If you're mitering the corners, your miters need to be EXACTLY 45*.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Dave66 said:
What Frank said above. Square or rectangle, if the opposite sides are EXACTLY the same length, just assemble your box and make the diagonal measurements the same.

If you're mitering the corners, your miters need to be EXACTLY 45*.
I understand you and Frank about the diagonals are the same for square.. Also diagonals for rectangle has to be same, but for comparison's sake measurement for square diagonals are different from rectangles'; shorter.

I agree with you and Frank about 45 degree mitering. It has to be the same regardless square or rectangle. 45 degree has nothing to do with diagonals.
 

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Just to expand on the 3-4-5 rule. You don't have to use 3, 4 and 5. The actual formal is a^2 + b^2 = c^2 (a squared, plus b squared equals c squared). Takes more math than 3-4-5, but if you need to use measurements other than 3 and 4 as the bottom and side edges, it'll get you there. I'll sometimes use that because I want something loner than 3 and 4 inches so that I can be more precise, but the object isn't big enough to use feet.
 
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