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great work!

Carlo, you do great work. I am just starting the restoration of 1978 Erickson 36C sailboat that has extensive mahogany paneling in the interior. I'm curious how you choose the mix of products to get the desired color. I need to match the existing color, which appears to be a flat oil or stain. My biggest issue is matching new bungs when I re-install individual planks.
thanks,
Joe
 

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Varnish neanderthalensis
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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
Carlo, you do great work. I am just starting the restoration of 1978 Erickson 36C sailboat that has extensive mahogany paneling in the interior. I'm curious how you choose the mix of products to get the desired color. I need to match the existing color, which appears to be a flat oil or stain. My biggest issue is matching new bungs when I re-install individual planks.
thanks,
Joe
Thank you, I'm no expert here, chemmy is the maestro, a real master finisher, but I will try.

Perhaps in two ways, either dying the wood before applying the sealer with a dye or stain or after the sealer coloring the varnish, I usually prefer the second route because if I make a mistake all I have to do is sand or scrape a little, plus the lighter colored areas stay lighter and I get more contrast, I like to keep the wood lighter colored so I get more reflexes.

If you need to dye the wood perhaps use colored oil as a stain/dye or the Orasol dyes from Kremer in alcohol or lightfast water based ones.

I usually go light on the stain/dye, and if needed apply again.

This way is faster than correcting with varnish, but sometimes there is the capillary effect problem.

With varnish (my prefered method), what I do is seal/color the wood normally, after all is done I apply darker colored varnish only to the lighter colored parts.

If the difference is brutal and there is no risk of the capillary effect, I prefer staining/dying a little before, even if I don't reach the color at the moment it is not a problem, I'll adjust later with colored varnish.

For oil based varnish you can mix bitumen of judea diluted in white spiris (or turpentine) in the oil varnish with a little alizarine crimson (to take the green tint away) or artists colors from Kremer or Winsor and Newton or any other high quality ones.

Better to reach the color you want in a few coats instead of one, easier and more transparent.

I know there are some oil based dyes that are very transparent and lightfast, but I have never used them, worth checking it out.
 

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Thanks for the quick response. Looks like I will be doing some experimenting on color choices. As far as I can tell my interior woodwork is not varnished, but I'm not sure if it was stained or simply oiled. I predict some interesting times ahead.
Joe
 
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