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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This mahogany bar was fun to build. Overall it stands about 10ft high, including the header which is about 20ft long x 12" high. The main overhead header is about 5ft in diameter, and the double bullnose mouldings are 1 1/2" each for a 3" pair. There is a corresponding header on the opposing wall with a 30" clear hole through both headers for a potted tree to extend through. The decorative filler on the bar and header is hammered copper and brass (by others). The trick to this bar was the curved bullnoses and half rounds made on a curve. The edging on the bartop is a double 2" bullnose. The finish is a NGR red mahogany methanol based stain with clear lacquer finish.
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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Come on Cabby you're holdin out on us. At least explain how you made the round trimwork on around the top. And oh how about a picture of that top?

The top is 3/4" marble on top of 3/4" plywood, with the double bullnose moulding. To do the curved moulding and to do it on a flat plane it could be cut from solid stock. If done on a curved plane (bar front) it's done in a profile procedure.


This is a procedure to make curved moulding, that is of any profile. If what you want is larger or longer than the solid stock you have, or it's too much to make it out of solid stock, this might work for you. I came up with this method many years ago out of necessity, with excellent results. The idea with this is you will be needing two (2) lengths of identical moulding "A" and "B", to make curved piece "C". Keep in mind this is a lamination method and the final moulding will have varied grain due to it being laminated from two different pieces of wood.

As you see in the drawings, "C" is cut to be glued up and installed along its left side. You can start with buying two identical pieces of moulding or make them. The drawings for this explanation are segmented into 1/8" sections, to facilitate the use of an 1/8" kerf cut. Most woods will bend well in 1/8" thickness. Each segment of "A" and "B" represent a "save" or "saw kerf".

The cross hatched segments represent a "saw kerf". So, after slicing on the TS the segments of both "A" and "B", you will save the segments "a" from "B", "b" from "A", "c" from "B", "d" from "A", etc, for the rest of the profile.

When you have the "saved" segments they will get glued up to form "C" moulding. They can be glued up and clamped all at once or a few at a time. It's imperative to align the moulding up so the profile will be consistant.

Taller curves can be created by just vertically stacking one or more profiles, provided you have made forms for the moulding to glue to. Segments that are covered by another segment can be pin nailed if necessary.
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Forgotten but not gone
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Well that is exactly the kind of deatail i was hoping for. The problem is i can't grasp what you are saying. I might be, but if I am it seems like an extremely delicate process at best.
Are you saying you somehow profile the individual strips across the TS blade and then glue them all up around a form?

I wish you had taken pictures as you did this I would love to see it. I have a hard tme seeing things from a description.

Thanks for posting it though.
 

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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well that is exactly the kind of deatail i was hoping for. The problem is i can't grasp what you are saying. I might be, but if I am it seems like an extremely delicate process at best.
Are you saying you somehow profile the individual strips across the TS blade and then glue them all up around a form?

I wish you had taken pictures as you did this I would love to see it. I have a hard tme seeing things from a description.
Thanks for posting it though.

I'll try to explain it a little differently. What you want to end up with is several layers (1/8" thick) that when stacked up will be the ultimate profile. So, you start with two pieces of the profiled moulding, and take a section out of each one on the TS. Since there is a sawcut taking out a section, that missing one comes from one of the two profiles. If you read the OP carefully, and look at the pictures, all of a sudden it will hit ya in the face. When doing the installation of the pieces, they stack up as one finished profile. Is that any easier?
 

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Very nice work

Tex,
The 2 profiles A & B are premade moldings that are identical. You alternate 1/8" cutouts from each piece to laminate together around a form to achieve the rounded molding needed. You need to use both to keep the same profile as you lose the saw kerf as you rip these down. If you would print the picture get out your scissors and remove the hashed lines from profile A & B then reassemble the pieces to form the same profile which equals C. I think that may clear things up a little. You still need a form to relaminate these together around to meet the radius of the project.

Again very nice looking project. Obviously not just a hobby. Keep up the good work.
 

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:wallbash: :wallbash: :wallbash:

Thanks diealey and cabman. I was beating my head against the wall. But . . . . the lighht bulb finally went off. And man, that seems like alot of work. And alot of tedious work! Would it not be a whole lot easier to have steamed it? Building a steam chamber seems very simple although i have not used either process the bending or the lamination like you did so this is not a suggestion but a question -- the question being did you consider building a simple steam chamber and bending the wood?
 

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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
:wallbash: :wallbash: :wallbash:

Thanks diealey and cabman. I was beating my head against the wall. But . . . . the lighht bulb finally went off. And man, that seems like alot of work. And alot of tedious work! Would it not be a whole lot easier to have steamed it? Building a steam chamber seems very simple although i have not used either process the bending or the lamination like you did so this is not a suggestion but a question -- the question being did you consider building a simple steam chamber and bending the wood?

I've never steamed a piece that didn't have some spring back. Glued up lamination is the only way other that cutting out of solid stock that is predictable. BTW, glad your bulbs are workin'.:yes:
 
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