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Wood anatomy is even better than fingerprints = there are no two the same.

1. I see all three useful planes of section: radial, transverse and tangential.
The physical block was cut so cleanly, maybe very soft wood and a very sharp edge.

2. I see 2 vessels ( stacks of vessel element cells) means the wood is either incredibly hard or soft.
The existence of vessels means the wood cannot possibly be a conifer/gymnosperm.

3. Looking closely, there's a huge number of small crushed clusters of thin-walled cells.

4. Ironically, for all the trouble that I went to, in my collection of 300+ wood species as microscopic section of radial transverse and tangential sections, balsa is one that I do not have.
 

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Yeah, Brian, What kind of wood is it?
Do you have an electron microscope?
Would be interesting to see oak, ash, beech, pine and other kind of wood.
Next time I'm in my boxed-up references I'll try to copy some pics, spent a little of my career converting trees into tissue, and venting dusts.
 

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Very cool pic @bargoon! Thank you for sharing it. Thanks to @Brian T. for his analysis. I learned a lot from it.

This would make a pretty clear example to newbies on why end grain isn't great for fasteners or glue.
Would explain further what you see in the image that leads you to that conclusion? I understand about end grain and fasteners and gluing, but I am not sure what it is at this scale that drives it.
 
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