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Twokamprs
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's only a few days ago since my last communication, but I now have a new one.

About 3 months ago I finished a standing quilt rack built from a plan. The rack has 16 joints glued and secured by screws. The plan called for plugs sanded smooth to cover the screw heads. I used oak doweling glued in place.

This rack does get moved from time to time and holds a pair of heavy quilts which are loaded and removed regularly. These stresses have loosened every one of those plugs just slightly.

There was no special instruction in the plan for these screws or plugs, so I used some course thread flat-head construction screws I had on hand.

What should, or could, I have done to avoid these loosening plugs. Different screws? Glue in the screw holes?

Any and all suggestions are welcome, again. Thanks in advance!
 

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Twokamprs
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53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The upload function for attachments is not working. I have submitted a request for a fix. As soon as it is fixed, I will reply with attachments.
 

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It's only a few days ago since my last communication, but I now have a new one.

About 3 months ago I finished a standing quilt rack built from a plan. The rack has 16 joints glued and secured by screws. The plan called for plugs sanded smooth to cover the screw heads. I used oak doweling glued in place.

This rack does get moved from time to time and holds a pair of heavy quilts which are loaded and removed regularly. These stresses have loosened every one of those plugs just slightly.

There was no special instruction in the plan for these screws or plugs, so I used some course thread flat-head construction screws I had on hand.

What should, or could, I have done to avoid these loosening plugs. Different screws? Glue in the screw holes?

Any and all suggestions are welcome, again. Thanks in advance!
here is what you should have done, i have done this for yrs and never had a plug come loose, they are tappered 5 degrees and a snug fit, i put a little glue in the hole and drive the plug tell it bottom's out , than sand flush , here is the plug cutter that is the best , now use it with the tappered bit and hole cutter, i use 3/8" the link http://www.wlfuller.com/html/tapered.html and the counter bore and dirll bit which is a match set you will have to look around a little but this combo is the best, now their is another company that sell the same type of item but it is junk, the other link http://wlfuller.com/html/products.html
 

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It's not likely the use of the quilt rack but the fact it's inside in the heat. Dowels don't work well as plugs. Remember, wood shrinks across the width, essentially the hole gets larger and the dowel gets smaller. You need to get a plug cutter so you can use face grain that will match the grain on the work. The tapered plug cutter along with a tapered drill is the way to go. Dowels have smooth long grain sides. The tapered plugs will have end grain sides that match the holes. You can also align the face grain of the plugs with the work for an almost invisible plug.
 
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