Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some logs I'm having milled and before I go into questions on the subject here again, does anyone know if there is an existing thread discussing the various ways to have them milled ?
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Jim Pa, I'm sure there's been several threads BUT each log and owner are unique in what they want/ desire or can be cut.

Here's a few things to think about.....1) what's the end desire...a product or lumber/lumber style?? 2) is it for personal use or to resale??? 3) desired thicknesses??? 4) tables, benches require thicker.....boxed items require thinner 5) Do you want rustic or classic type lumber??? 6) Plain or qtr sawn???

This list can go on and on!! I cut and build rustic/salvaged style. Check my website for rustic live edged type wood.

Post yours questions or direction of idea and I'll be glad to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Tim.
These are red oak logs averaging 24" to 28" in thru thickness.
I should add here that this tree, about a 70 to 80 foot, about 50' straight and clear, was uprooted, a blow down, two summers ago and has been suspended off of the ground since then. There is about an inch of rotten sap wood under the bark. I've already taken a length out of this tree a week ago and the inner wood is in great shape.
The lumber will be for personal use for making furniture and such for our home. Don't yet know what those pieces will be, other than my wife wanting a roll top desk for one. ( I want quarter sawn for that , right ?)
Anyhow.
My question is, other than the 1/4 sawn for the desk. What other ways of cutting should I be considering ?
More specifically. I was thinking of having one log flat sawn with live edges, just so I can get the widest boards from it for possible table top use. Are there concerns such as possible cupping if the log is cut in this fashion ?
Can thickness of cut help control any cupping ?
Am I sacrificing beauty of wood with this type of milling ?
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Thin and Wide are a wild road to go....yes it can be done, but with more risks....DEFINITELY more stickers (closer) and wieght. I've heard several people cut 9-10/4 and dry then recut to 4/4 for better control. If you got that much WONDERFUL straight logs, I'd cut alot of 4/4 qtr sawn and plain sawn out of the main trunk....the live edge stuff in 6/4 - 8/4 out of the first log cut (flair into root ball is AWESOME, may have to be bookmatched due to the saw width capability) and then logs after you get up to the limb logs where the character stuff is in the logs.

This is a starting point....GOT PICS!!!????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks Tim. I will take your experienced advise and have it milled as you suggest. I learned yesterday that there is also a kiln at the mill and he will dry for .30bf. Can't hardly argue with .60 milled and kiln dried free old growth red oak.

This is the best I could do for pics. This snow just won't stop here today. As you can see. The base is about 10-11' long.
I'm guesstimating about 30" thru at base.
IMGP3269.jpg
IMGP3268.jpg

Hard to tell by the angle of the pic, but there is about 30' of clear left in the upper tree. ( before you get into the branch area)
IMGP3270.jpg
IMGP3271.jpg
Maybe I'll get as much as I can out of the upper tree, branch area, and have it milled just to see what kind of character is in there.

I've already taken about 10-12 feet out of this tree. 6' is at the mill and the rest I cut up for fire wood. I know, SHAME ON ME !!!!
I took that 6' for fire wood and then I just couldn't 'waste' any more of this beautiful tree and decided to have it milled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Tim is the resident "expert" sawyer but the live edge stuff I would cut 2" thick so you can plane/sand any cupping/warping caused by drying. I absolutely love quarter sawn oak! I believe your post said they were both red oaks. It's been my experience you don't get as nice annular ray "flecks" out of red oak that you would white oak. Also keep in mind that your waste, by quarter sawing, is more that most people would think. Those appear to be pretty nice long logs but if you have any crotch areas I would suggest you saw up some slabs from them too. Look at some of the past posts of crotch lumber and its beautifull. As ususal, post some pictures when you get it back from the saw mill. dew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Dew,
My local sawyer also told me about the red not having the nice flecks that the white does. I'm thinking that I may hold off on the 1/4 sawn wood until I locate a white oak. ( My wife wants a roll top )
I have 20+ acres up north and there's a good chance I have a white oak up there.
I am definitely going to look closely at the upper part of this tree and see if there is enough worth taking to the mill so I can get some crotch wood from it.
This tree blew over two summers ago and though it has been off of the ground for the past two+ years, the top is showing a good bit of rot. The main trunk has about an inch of rot under the bark. It appears to be two trees because I've already taken a log out of the 'middle'.
I will most definitely post up some pics after it's all out and milled.
Temps are holding fast at single digits and lower teens here so nothing is gonna happen for a while.
 

·
Senior Something
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
.....
My local sawyer also told me about the red not having the nice flecks that the white does. .....
I'm going to have to disagree. I've seen some beautiful QS Red Oak lumber. Years ago, a local farmer gave me a large downed RO tree for firewood. As I cut it up and split the pieces, you wouldn't believe the amount of flecks. Maybe not all ROs are as pronounced as WO, I don't know. I almost cried as I cut up the log. It had lain there too long, though, and was punky. I couldn't even use it as firewood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was actually questioning his statement in my mind as he was saying it. I too have seen some absolutely beautiful flecking in red oak as I reluctantly split it for firewood.
Like you've said djg, I suppose it depends on the tree.

Mmmm..maybe he was just trying to tell me that character
in the wood is more often found in white oak vs. red oak. ?
He is a mill shop and goes through a LOT of trees in his business.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
We have about 30 different species of oaks around here (native and introduced). Most are called lumped into either the red oak family (pointed leaves) or the white oak family (lobed leaves). With that many different species there is some overlap of characteristics.

I have seen rays in alleged 'red oaks' and none in alleged 'white oaks'. I agree that it is more likely to occur in white oaks than in red oaks but I wouldn't assume either way. I approach each log like a present - you may not know what you are going to get but hopefully each one is nice in its own way. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Tom is right. Every log is different. Generally, the rays are more pronounced in white oak, but can be very attractive on red oak. Rather than having one log quarter sawn, and another flat sawn, have the sawyer use a pattern that maximizes the quarter sawn lumber in each log (you will get some quartersawn lumber, no matter how it is milled), but still maximizes the yield. You should be able to get about 30% quartersawn lumber out of each log without sacrificing any volume. It does require more turning, which takes time. Sawyers charging by the board foot don't like to do that, which may explain his reluctance to quarter saw the red oak. You may need to pay a little extra to make it worthwhile to the sawyer.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top