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I'm planning a jewelry box project and want to step into the world of oil finishes. I typically spray lacquer, but I'm using pretty woods and want to really show it off. I am thinking an oil varnish, like the General Finishes Arm-r-seal. Is this a reasonable way to go? I want a finish that cures to give some protection, but definitely dont need a super hard or thick film build.
 

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I'm planning a jewelry box project and want to step into the world of oil finishes. I typically spray lacquer, but I'm using pretty woods and want to really show it off. I am thinking an oil varnish, like the General Finishes Arm-r-seal. Is this a reasonable way to go? I want a finish that cures to give some protection, but definitely dont need a super hard or thick film build.
Well that isn't an oil finish. It is a film coating like your lacquer only better. If you thin it and don't put too many coats on, it could be used as a oil finish. Just try some on some scraps first. Generally when someone looks into oil finishes it is a Danish oil finish, tung oil or linseed oil.
 

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I'm planning a jewelry box project and want to step into the world of oil finishes. I typically spray lacquer, but I'm using pretty woods and want to really show it off. I am thinking an oil varnish, like the General Finishes Arm-r-seal. Is this a reasonable way to go? I want a finish that cures to give some protection, but definitely dont need a super hard or thick film build.
The Arm-R Seal is an oil varnish mix in a wipe on consistency, similar to the product labeled 'Danish Oil Finish'. Neither are an oil finish, but a stand alone film finish. Totally different than just a boiled linseed oil, or a pure tung oil.




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I have so much to learn... Will the oil finishes cure and provide some protection to the wood? I've heard a lot about tung oil but have never used it. Is that considered an oil varnish?
 

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I just finished a jewelry box for my wife. I used tru oil. It is made for gun stocks. I used maple and walnut on this box. It gives the maple a little bit of an amber color and darkens the walnut. Both turned out great. It helps protect everything too. I did about 5 thin coats over a couple days. Turned out nice.
 

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I have so much to learn... Will the oil finishes cure and provide some protection to the wood? I've heard a lot about tung oil but have never used it. Is that considered an oil varnish?
Using just an oil, like boiled linseed oil, or 100% pure Tung oil will provide a film type finish when dry and enough applications have been made. As for pure Tung oil, it will offer some degree of waterproofing, and impart less of an amber tone to the wood. It will leave a nice smooth feel, and it's not an oil/varnish mix.

The "oil finishes", like those labeled "Danish Oil Finish", "Tung Oil Finish", or "Teak Oil Finish", that have "Finish" on the label are oil varnish mixes.






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I have so much to learn... Will the oil finishes cure and provide some protection to the wood? I've heard a lot about tung oil but have never used it. Is that considered an oil varnish?
Both linseed oil and tung oil will provide protection to the wood however linseed oil is barely water resistant where tung oil is waterproof. Neither one coat of either would provide a great deal of protection. Apply as much of the oil as you can letting each coat dry completely. Eventually it will start to look like if you put another coat on it would start to look like varnish. At that point stop. Nobody could tell you just how many coats. It would vary on the wood, how it is sanded and the weather. The finer the wood is sanded the less coats it would take.
 

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Thank you for the responses, that is very helpful. I am thinking of using an oil/varnish blend that will give it the nice rich color of the oil while offering protection of the varnish.
 

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The previous answers all sound good; but if the wood is precious and you already put al ot of effort in this project, you might want to try the options on spare pieces of wood to see how it would look.

This way you avoid taking unnecessary risks
 
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