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I have a large bedroom with 5 enormous windows on one side of the room, giving us spectacular natural light. The problem is, I'm a fan of sleeping in and starting in Spring that's not possible due to the influx of morning light. So I had an idea to install light-blocking, motorized roller blinds. Further, I knew a very talented career carpenter that found my idea of a crown molding to hide these blinds amusing so he helped me create this neat solution:

Building Property Window Fixture Wood


"Hey Google, lower the master bedroom shades..."

Window Building Fixture Shade Wood


[ whirrrrrrrrrrr ]

Wood Automotive exterior Shade Fixture Rectangle


The good news: the light is blocked around 99% and the difference is substantial.

The bad news: that 1% is annoying, and due to the nature and length of the light-blocking blind material, it tends to bow away from the window somewhat at full extension:

Fixture Wood Floor Building Tints and shades


Also, I plan on installing white/cream curtains up in the recess of the crown molding, cascading down dramatically and pooling at the floor (wife's vision. no compromises). The material of these blinds, after many years of flawless service, has a tendency to leave some residue at the edges which would likely mess with wife's curtains. Also I could see the blinds getting caught up in the fabric.

So, I need some kind of solution ... initially I was thinking of a pvc track, and I constructed something out of a cable-hiding product, but it was multiple pieces which caused problems when the weighted bottom, which is mostly in-line with the edge of the window casing, but sometimes not (due to length of material, floor vents messing with it, etc) got caught up on the track. Plus, it looked super hokey.

So I need a better, more elegant solution. Here's a closeup of the bottom of one of the windows:

Wood Stairs Gas Parallel Composite material


I'm envisioning some kind of "C" shaped ... something, that reaches up into the crown molding adjacent to the window casing. I have rudimentary woodworking abilities. The awesome carpenter I knew is too busy with new builds to take on piddly things like this anymore.

I've seen this forum come up with amazing ideas for a different situation I had, so I'm really looking forward to any inspiration here!

Thanks
 

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I would first find a thin plastic magnetic strip that could be attached to the bottom weighted bar on the bottom of the blackout shades and install a thin sheet metal strip on the front of the horizontal architrave moulding at the base of each window. You could paint the sheet metal strip the same color as the rest of your widow trim color. As to a complete build of C channel architrave extensions that would project out and edge in front of the edges of your blackout curtains, you're taking on a big project with lots of precision long vertical joints joining your existing vertical architraves to the new edge extensions (C channels). If you do decide to tackle this, you might want to add replicated detailing matching or co-ordinating with your existing architrave profiles. The extensions should extend up into the crown moulding hollow corners, filling in space with the new c channel mouldings.
 

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Black out fabric for curtains is usually a cloth with resin or rubberized type infusion. To help remove the curling along the edges gently moderately heat the fabric with a hair dryer.... this often helps straighten out those curls on dedicated black out fabric. Not sure if your curtain is a dedicated black out fabric, but I would suppose so.

Many long curtains are usually heavy enough to hang properly, however, many curtains have a small disc lead weight in each the lower corners. Maybe attaching a metal "coin" on the back side corners and a white rare earth magnet on the window trim would hold the curtain against the trim.

Sonny
Curtain weights in small "socks" sewn to and inside a curtain hem, shown adjacent to a Susan B. Anthony dollar coin.
Material property Wood Coin Office ruler Currency
 
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