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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to wood working and would like to get some advice on what is the best use for some wood that I have.

My job gets these beams in from time to time (they're part of the packing so the parts don't move in transit) and they don't need them for anything so they just throw them away. I told them I would take them and try and make use of them. What would be the best use for them?
They are 79 inches long by 6 inches tall by 3.5 inches thick. I thought about ripping boards out of them, my table saw can cut 3.5 inches but it's a lot of work for a table saw. I also thought about investing in a band saw and then I could rip the 6 in side into boards. No clue on what species they are, definitely a mix of different types.

Suggestions?

What would everyone here do if they had them?

Thank you for any help you can provide
 

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Those would make a pretty awesome bench...
 

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Impossible to tell species from that far away. Take a close up of a cut end, and of the side grain.
Where do the pallets come from? Usually local wood is used in these circumstances, and will give you a big clue as to type.
 

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Depends upon what kind of wood they are to know what to do with them. Highly doubt that it would be worth purchasing a new/used saw just to rip them.

Without ripping they would be useful as the legs of a work bench. The one you show seems to have a bad portion, but there is enough for a leg.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Impossible to tell species from that far away. Take a close up of a cut end, and of the side grain.
Where do the pallets come from? Usually local wood is used in these circumstances, and will give you a big clue as to type.
The stamp on all of them is from Mexico. I have approximately 50 of them and I'd say the vary spices quite a bit. I'm going to start a different post with pictures of some of the stranger looking ones to see if anyone can help me ID what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Depends upon what kind of wood they are to know what to do with them. Highly doubt that it would be worth purchasing a new/used saw just to rip them.

Without ripping they would be useful as the legs of a work bench. The one you show seems to have a bad portion, but there is enough for a leg.

George
That dark color on the bottom right is it turning colors from moisture/sun, it's not rotten.

I prefer the natural wood color so I can stain it in the future, I'm trying to keep the rain off them and out of the sun. Is it a fools errand to try an stop this color change? Is it inevitable?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Tablesaws are really good at ripping stock 2.5" or less in thickness. A bandsaw is much better at ripping stock 2.5" or thicker. Get one, you'll find that out. If you can afford one with a 12" height capacity, like some 14" models or an 18". I have one 18" and 3 - 14" saws, but I often have more than one of the same type of machine. I get them cheap, free or on sale!
 

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Years ago we used to see dunage in a lot of domestic hardwoods, oak, white oak and sometimes soft maple. Now we see mostly yellow pine and gum. Be careful because a lot of that stuff (along with pallet wood) is treated with chemicals.
 

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If the wood is stamped. then you should carefully check out the entire stamp. many pallet and packing woods are coated in insecticides and other dangerous chemicals.
These need to be handled very carefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Years ago we used to see dunage in a lot of domestic hardwoods, oak, white oak and sometimes soft maple. Now we see mostly yellow pine and gum. Be careful because a lot of that stuff (along with pallet wood) is treated with chemicals.
Thank you. The heat stamp on them says they haven't been treated with any chemicals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Years ago we used to see dunage in a lot of domestic hardwoods, oak, white oak and sometimes soft maple. Now we see mostly yellow pine and gum. Be careful because a lot of that stuff (along with pallet wood) is treated with chemicals.
I've noticed that the bandsaws vary wildly in horse power. What size do you think would be necessary for these if I went that route?
 

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My best wood carving bench has a deck made of 4x4, bolted together (shrinkage from the mill).
Mass is beautiful. That bench doesn't "walk" from repeated mallet or adze strikes.
Big wood for carvers is hard to come by. Is there a local carving club you could ask?
A bunch of those, in a glue-up could be a useful size.
 

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I've noticed that the bandsaws vary wildly in horse power. What size do you think would be necessary for these if I went that route?
That's a hard question to answer, but 1.5HP should take you pretty far.

Blade selection is very important. Get 2 or 3 tpi or so for sawing 4-6" thick stock. Your HP will determine tour feed rate.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Tablesaws are really good at ripping stock 2.5" or less in thickness. A bandsaw is much better at ripping stock 2.5" or thicker. Get one, you'll find that out. If you can afford one with a 12" height capacity, like some 14" models or an 18". I have one 18" and 3 - 14" saws, but I often have more than one of the same type of machine. I get them cheap, free or on sale!
 
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