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Discussion Starter #1
In about 2008 I refinished some redwood with Seal-A-Cell (SAC) followed by Arm-R-Seal (ARS) satin finish (no stain, didn't need it). I really liked the soft luster/sheen that the satin finish produced. I had tried a number of finishes at the time and still have the test pieces.


I wanted to do the same with some more redwood and use SAC and ARS again. I did a couple of test pieces with a new can to confirm I was going to get the same result. This time the sheen was much more shiny, almost a semi-gloss. I bought another can at Rockler (different lot number) and got the same result. I am pretty sure that I am stirring it long enough. During my stirring, I periodically drag the stirrer over the bottom of the can then pull it out to look at it. Once I don't see any "gunk", I still stir for about 2 more minutes. The total stirring on a new pint can be as much as 5-6 minutes.



I saw on this group that someone else had seen this change in sheen with ARS: https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/satin-arm-r-seal-recently-way-too-shiny-121009/


I really like Arm-R-Seal for its ease and durability but the increased glossiness is not the look I am hoping for. Does anyone have any recommendations of something to try - either with ARS or another product? Thanks.
 

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welcome to the forum, D. Rose. what part of the world are you in ?
are you finishing a dining room table, front porch or back deck ??
I don't use ARS or SAC so I can't provide any info on that.

I admire your stirring skills to get the sheen that it was intended for.
many novice members get upset when the sheen is not as they expected
due to insufficient stirring of all the contents.
good job on that !!

.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I salvaged a lot clear all heart redwood paneling (1x4 and 1x6) from a midcentury modern house (1960) we owned here in Houston that flooded. It is just beautiful wood. I am working with a carpenter to put some of the 1x6 up on a wall in the house we bought recently. It was originally just stained (back in 1960 I assume).
 

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The gunk in the bottom of the can is the flattening agent. In dry form it looks like baby powder. The more of the flattening agent the finish has the duller the sheen. It's possible the can you bought was defective in that it may not have the amount of flattening agent it was suppose to for satin. From where you are you might take a jar or empty can to a real paint store and purchase a few ounces of flattening agent. Little by little you can add flattening agent to the finish and test it until you get the desired sheen. If you can't find someone to sell you the flattening agent you can purchase another can of satin and without stirring it pour off the urethane off the gunk in the bottom. Then use the gunk in the bottom to alter the can you are working with. The downside is you will never be able to match the formula exactly if you need some for touch up. You might just also try using the second can however if the sheen on that can is too glossy too it would take weeks for the flattening agent to settle enough you could pour off the urethane.
 

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In Jeff Jewletts book, Complete Guide to Finishing, I recall he adds talc powder to flatten clear finishes. I don't have the book with me so I can't check to be sure.
 

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Ancient Termite
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You don't say where you are located.

MinWax Antique Oil Finish does exactly what you are intending. MAOF is available at Rockler, Home Depot, Ace Hardware but not in the state of California. If you reside in California you will have to take your piece out of state and finish it there. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You don't say where you are located.

MinWax Antique Oil Finish does exactly what you are intending. MAOF is available at Rockler, Home Depot, Ace Hardware but not in the state of California. If you reside in California you will have to take your piece out of state and finish it there. :)

I don't live in California. I have never used MAOF. If I need to repair the finish in the future, what are the steps that need to be taken. Thanks
 

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CharleyL
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Actually, the common finish used on wood paneling in the 40's 50's and 60's isn't stain at all, but may be orange shellac, and it's easily restored or repaired with more orange shellac. My 1950's kitchen and family room are solid fir random width boards that are covered with several coats of orange shellac. Before going any further, it would be a good idea to buy a quart of Zinser Orange Shellac and test it's color match against the wood boards that you have. Just this test may find the perfect match to what is already there, but don't expect perfect, until you have applied several coats with at least a few days of drying in between. Adding a coat will dissolve the previous coat some, so don't overlap the same place several times. Just put it on and let it dry. Then, when dry, add another coat if it's the right color, but not dark enough.

Charley
 

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