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Go with a Lincoln or a Miller. Both are great machines. I would give the edge to Miller due to the fact that they are all made in the USA and they have great service and parts availability, but you are paying a premium for that. I have used some of the higher end Lincolns and was very impressed with those as well. I would also buy one where you can add shielding gas, since that is not a given in the 110v welder market. Without it, you need to use flux core wire, and IMO you do not get as nice of a weld.

Stay away from the Harbor Freight welders; I had one and I could not get two pieces of metal to stick together with it.
 

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We need more info. What do you intend to weld and are you looking for, a stick welder or wire feed. 110v will be a problem. While it's easy to find a 110v welder it won't weld very thick metal. You really need 220v for a welder. I have a 110v wire feed welder and about all it's good for is sheet metal.
 

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Hello everyone. I'm looking for a good 110v welder. What does everyone recommend?
What type of welding do you want to do? How thick of material and types of material?
I just went through this a few months ago. I was leaning toward a Miller. During my search I found a brand I wasn't aware of, ESAB. They are popular back east and gaining popularity in the west quite rapidly. Very reputable company and make a very high quality welder. I wanted the flexibility to do 120v or 230v if I needed it and also wanted to have multiprocess capability so I ended up buying an ESAB EMP 215ic. It's a great welder for both the professional and the weekend hobbiest. The one I got cost me about $1300 during a promotion. They also have a mig only welder the EM215ic. It also runs on both 120v and 230v. It runs around $1000. I like the construction of it. Its very portable, you can move around the shop or grab and go. It's also quite durable with bumpers all around. It has a smart mig feature which allows for a simple approach to welding mig, great for a beginner. You select the material thickness and wire diameter and thats all it figures out the rest for the right arc.
There are cheaper welders out there but I didn't want to be limited with voltage or type of welding and wanted something that would produce high quality welding so I don't have to worry about the quality of my welds due to cheap equipment. It will outlast me.
Anyway good luck with your search.

Here is a link to their website.
http://www.esabna.com/us/en/dare/index.cfm

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Smart and Cool
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I have a 110V Lincoln 135HD wire feed welder, it's a great little machine, does most of what I want to do, but obviously thicker material is not what it does well.

I started with flux wire, then added a bottle, the welds with gas are much better, but the flux wire does get the job done.

Don't scrimp on the helmet either, cheap auto darkening helmets are not worth risking your eyesight over $$'s.

As others have stated, your intended use plays into whether or not this is the right fit for you.
 

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I purchased a Lincoln 180c which has infinitely voltage vs only fixed settings. It runs on 220v and came with the gauges/hose to add gas if I wish. Just using flux core at this time. Another thing I found out is the big box stores version are lighter duty compared to a Lincoln dealer store. I'm told the difference is the wire drive in that the big box stores are plastic parts and the dealer are all metal. I would think the major names are all good... Lincoln, Hobart, Miller and lesser known Auto-Arc which our work place had was made by Miller I'm told. Really need to go 220v!
 

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I agree with the other comments about concerns over welding thicker metals with 110V. For this reason I have been looking at the Millermatic 211, since I can use either 110 or 220 with it. This way I have some portability if I have a small job to do in an area without 220 plug, but I am not limited on larger jobs. This also has the ability to add on a spool gun to MIG aluminum, another thing I may need to do in the future.

I have also been looking at the multifunction machines, but the fact that they only have DC TIG capability has had me doubting whether that feature is worth the extra cost.
 

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I agree with the other comments about concerns over welding thicker metals with 110V. For this reason I have been looking at the Millermatic 211, since I can use either 110 or 220 with it. This way I have some portability if I have a small job to do in an area without 220 plug, but I am not limited on larger jobs. This also has the ability to add on a spool gun to MIG aluminum, another thing I may need to do in the future.

I have also been looking at the multifunction machines, but the fact that they only have DC TIG capability has had me doubting whether that feature is worth the extra cost.
I just saw that ESAB has come out with a multiprocess welder that does both AC and DC tig so you can do aluminum, steel, and stainless. Its the EMP 205ic supposed to be available 2nd qtr this year. I just bought my welder the 215ic a few months ago that does DC only wish I would have know about this one would have waited.

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Smart and Cool
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I purchased a Lincoln 180c which has infinitely voltage vs only fixed settings. It runs on 220v and came with the gauges/hose to add gas if I wish. Just using flux core at this time. Another thing I found out is the big box stores version are lighter duty compared to a Lincoln dealer store. I'm told the difference is the wire drive in that the big box stores are plastic parts and the dealer are all metal. I would think the major names are all good... Lincoln, Hobart, Miller and lesser known Auto-Arc which our work place had was made by Miller I'm told. Really need to go 220v!
Not sure if this is a recent change, I have the 135HD from Home Depot, clearanced at $200, 5-6 years old.

My wire drive rollers are metal, not sure how they could be plastic and provide polarity...
 

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Maybe not plastic, but lower quality of drive system. Can't fully remember what the dealer said as mine is about 4 yrs old.
 

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where's my table saw?
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This one was recommended ...

I was in the auto parts "store" by my house talking to the substitute counterman about TIG welders, and if he knew anyone who could TIG...? He gave me a guy's name, but said if I want to buy one, get this one, which he owned:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/AHP-AlphaT...999990?hash=item4b009f7f36:g:WAEAAOSwygJXg-bA

When I go TIG I would probably get that one, but the ESABs look good also, but 2 X the price. Dual voltage on the EBAY one!
 
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