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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently cut up a length of Oak into 45 deg miter cuts and some of the angles were a hair off.

I believe the saw is accurate, but it might have been the board wasn’t so straight. I didn’t run it though the joiner like I should have because the pieces were small and I didn’t think it would mater much. So I was flipping the board over for each cut to save wood and avoid changing the saw position. Well one side was perfect and the other was just a hair off probably because the board on the other end was a little warped.

Plus I had the glass cut at Lowe’s and I discovered that after two separate glass projects their gutter is not a true square. If I would have known that I would have compensated for the length of cuts so I could at least get the frame square.

Anyway I was thinking that if I had an accurate way of sanding the angle true, I would be able to fix them when they pop up. I was looking at a porter cable bench sander, but I already have a HF 6" Belt sander only this looked a little more accurate.



Then I stopped at HF and saw this 12” disk sander for much less money and looks even more accurate.



So what do you think? Anybody use one of these bad boys for miter joints?
 

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I've never used one for miters, but it seems to me like it actually would make things worse... unless you are just mitering a very small piece. I'm trying to imagine how you would run a long, mitered edge against that with any sort of consistency.
 

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I recently picked up a grizzly 15"disk sander and it has fast become one of my favorite tools in the shop. I have used it to do exactly what you are suggesting. It is so easy to sand things perfectly square once I set the table and miter gauge up.
 

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I think you would find the HF sander underpowered for anything but the lightest work.(5.7 Amp) I doubt the disk would be very flat or run very true also. Just my opinion. :smile:
Do you have this sander?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've never used one for miters, but it seems to me like it actually would make things worse... unless you are just mitering a very small piece. I'm trying to imagine how you would run a long, mitered edge against that with any sort of consistency.
I was thinking that largest miter surface would be like a 1x3 or 4” max and the length not more than a couple of feet.

I recently picked up a grizzly 15"disk sander and it has fast become one of my favorite tools in the shop. I have used it to do exactly what you are suggesting. It is so easy to sand things perfectly square once I set the table and miter gauge up.
I’m sure the grizzly 15"disk sander would be great, but in my little home shop, I would only be using it 3 or 4 times year unless I had another purpose. So I don't know if I could justify the expense.
I think you would find the HF sander underpowered for anything but the lightest work.(5.7 Amp) I doubt the disk would be very flat or run very true also. Just my opinion. :smile:
I don’t know anything about the power but the reason I’m posting this is to find out about it running true. That really is the main consideration. Since I’m not actually cutting miters with it and only straightening them out, I don’t envision it would need much power.


The thing that impressed besides the large disk was the large table. I think I could make something to slide on it giving me good control.
 

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I have a Grizzly 12in disc sander.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0702

Not cheap, but I love this machine. I pondered the 10in disc Woodnthings linked, but decided I wanted the bigger diameter.

There are times I wish it was the 15in dia machine.

I use this to trim mitres, segmented turning segments and to sand curves on my cutting boards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a Grizzly 12in disc sander.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0702

Not cheap, but I love this machine. I pondered the 10in disc Woodnthings linked, but decided I wanted the bigger diameter.

There are times I wish it was the 15in dia machine.

I use this to trim mitres, segmented turning segments and to sand curves on my cutting boards.
Well that sure is impressive, but I would really need more uses for it. Actually now that i think of it sanding curves would be nice
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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I just now realized that sand paper disks are attached to the metal disk and I wonder if I could do the same thing by using and old saw blade.
A saw blade would have too much deflection. Not to mention the spinning teeth. :eek:
 

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Nope

That would not be the correct way to save a dollar. :no:
Exposed teeth will eventually bite you or your workpiece.

If you were to sand on the up rotation, the teeth would catch and launch the workpiece.

The other issue is that sanding on softwood tends to gum the paper rapidly because of the sap and pitch in the wood. It would be much better if you could get your cuts perfect from your table saw sled or miter saw. :yes:
 

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No, I do not. This is just my opinion from being around other Central Machinery products. :thumbdown:
Just wondering. I also considered this sander in the past for squareing the end of pen blanks. I went a different direction but was still curious if it was a decent sander.

FWIW, everything sold there isnt equal. I have a mini lathe from there thats been running strong for 2 years now and I have zero complaints about it. The DC also gets rave reviews. There are some gems there, you just have to do some research to find em! I will say that MOST things sold there is junk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That would not be the correct way to save a dollar. :no:
Exposed teeth will eventually bite you or your workpiece.

If you were to sand on the up rotation, the teeth would catch and launch the workpiece.

The other issue is that sanding on softwood tends to gum the paper rapidly because of the sap and pitch in the wood. It would be much better if you could get your cuts perfect from your table saw sled or miter saw. :yes:
Thanks Bill,

I just have cheap Craftsman 12” miter saw that I’ve had for over 15 years and I’ve made 1000s of cuts with it. Most were good nice cuts and I believe the bad ones were simply my fault when cutting long boards. I don’t have a lot of room to have a nice long table and depend on using adjustable stands. Unfortunately I don’t always get them positioned correctly and I need to come up with a better plan. I have used a laser level to adjust the stands in the past with great results and I probably should have used it in this case seeing that the boards were 8ft long.



I have thought about buying a new saw, but I really don’t think it will make much of a difference. I also have a sled that makes perfect straight cut but it can’t make miters. I also have a new miter gauge for my table saw but I thought it would be easier to do it on my miter saw.
 

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Thanks Bill,

I just have cheap Craftsman 12” miter saw that I’ve had for over 15 years and I’ve made 1000s of cuts with it. Most were good nice cuts and I believe the bad ones were simply my fault when cutting long boards. I don’t have a lot of room to have a nice long table and depend on using adjustable stands. Unfortunately I don’t always get them positioned correctly and I need to come up with a better plan. I have used a laser level to adjust the stands in the past with great results and I probably should have used it in this case seeing that the boards were 8ft long.


I have thought about buying a new saw, but I really don’t think it will make much of a difference. I also have a sled that makes perfect straight cut but it can’t make miters. I also have a new miter gauge for my table saw but I thought it would be easier to do it on my miter saw.
In this case since the boards are only a couple feet in length I'd consider chopping them close to length on the miter and making a simple miter sled for the table saw. Maybe it's just me, but I always feel my miter saws are more likely to cut sloppy 45's.
 

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Sleeper said:
Im sure the grizzly 15"disk sander would be great, but in my little home shop, I would only be using it 3 or 4 times year unless I had another purpose. So I don't know if I could justify the expense.
I was not trying to suggest you get this machine. It is just my only experience with larger disk sanders. I was trying to express that if the HF machine runs true, I think you will really like it. The control I have with my machine is really impressive. I can mark a line and sand right to it every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It just occurred to me that I should have clarified the actually miter cut I’m talking about so I took a photo of the actual cut and drew a drawing of what a jig might look like if I were to do it on a table saw.




This might better explain why I was thinking about the harbor freight disk sander.
 
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