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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We spray alot of solvent based finishes(laquer pre cat, conversion varnish ect) and have done so for about four years now (5-6 days a week 3-4 hrs a day). Of course theres ventilation and exhaust in the spray room and 95% of the time a respirator is used. But I was wondering if anyone has personal experience with the health effects after prolonged use (years) of this stuff? Cancer? Respitory problems? Are ya just a lil dumber than you used to be lol? Anyway, any info would be great. Thanks!
 

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We spray alot of solvent based finishes(laquer pre cat, conversion varnish ect) and have done so for about four years now (5-6 days a week 3-4 hrs a day). Of course theres ventilation and exhaust in the spray room and 95% of the time a respirator is used. But I was wondering if anyone has personal experience with the health effects after prolonged use (years) of this stuff? Cancer? Respitory problems? Are ya just a lil dumber than you used to be lol? Anyway, any info would be great. Thanks!

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We all differ in our resistance to certain toxins, and the degree of exposure may be a determining factor.
I can remember in my 20's and during my military career I thought I was indestructible. My mindset was in alignment with my physical abilities. After working in the shop for all those years with all the toxic vapors, direct chemical contact, dust, lifting, and noise, took its toll. Nineteen years ago I had a heart attack. Nine years ago I was diagnosed with cancer and the first few opinions didn't give much hope. Fortunately, after two surgeries, it hasn't returned...yet.

Now, I'm living with a multitude of handicaps. I've got problems with the feeling in the fingers and hands (nerve damage) (CTS), tendonitis, limited arm movements, COPD, hearing loss, arthritis, and a continuing heart problem.


It's difficult to say exactly which toxin did what. Vapors can get into the body with just skin exposure, any orifice (such as eyes, ears, hair follicles, nose, mouth, etc). There is also direct absorption through the skin with chemicals. My exposure was primarily lacquer, contact cement, lacquer thinner, mineral spirits, acetone, methanol, oil base products, and a very wide variety of wood species.

My exposure would be considered on the extreme side (six days a week for for 39 years). There's a possibility that some of my problems could be genetic, or that I may have become afflicted without the subjection to shop hazards. That seems unlikely to me, but possible.










 

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cabinetman, did you work in houses in 70, or just in the shop ?

Most all of my work is in the shop, and install at some other location, like homes, offices, stores, restaurants. Use of solvent type materials out of the shop is limited to hand use, like cleaning, or if any finishing is done it is wiped or brushed on.






 

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At the risk of offending a few, I'll add that I've met more than a couple painters who, after being in the trade for a decade or two, were just a bit off center.

Spraying oil based paints, primers, epoxies, automotive finishes and so forth that were thinned with every conceivable thinning agent seems not likely to improve one's sanity, coherency, or intellect.

We can only guess at what the new generation of finishes will accomplish.
 

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Your answer is bladder cancer is much higher. Bladder cancer attacks three groups, painters, smokers and those who drive vehicles sitting over a wheel. So if you fit more than one of those categories, your risk is high. Stopping is not the end all or be all I was caught 12 years later from smoking and 4 years from driving a van. Symptoms, blood in your urine, get it seen to yesterday.
 

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Dejure, No offense taken...after being in the painting field for 30 years.....I can honestly say, I wish! I knew then , what I know now...but a day late and a dollar short.

I have paint as blood, instead of blood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well now that's some encouraging stuff! (< sarcasm) :blink:

I know a guy who painted for 30 years, most of the time without a respirator. Let's just say his pile is def. short a few bricks.

Is it worth changing professions? We've worked hard ot get where we're at now, kinda sucks to think that it's gonna kill us off. What other precautions can we take? (other than the obvious)

Thanks for the answers guys! :smile:
 

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Well now that's some encouraging stuff! (< sarcasm) :blink:

I know a guy who painted for 30 years, most of the time without a respirator. Let's just say his pile is def. short a few bricks.

Is it worth changing professions? We've worked hard ot get where we're at now, kinda sucks to think that it's gonna kill us off. What other precautions can we take? (other than the obvious)

Thanks for the answers guys! :smile:

Changing professions is quite a drastic step. A few precautions would be:

Have adequate ventilation.
Install a proprietary spray booth.
Wear chemical resistant gloves when handling chemicals.
Buy the best respirator you can afford.
Get protective garb to keep vapors off the skin.
Install a sufficient air cleaner.
Wear protective gear until out of the area.

In small shops that are open area, chemicals and dust stay airborne for quite a while. It's an impulse to rip off that mask way too soon.

Switching to waterbase products will greatly decrease your risk.






 
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