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I am building a cabinet for my wife's pastel chaulks. each drawer is 18" wide, 12" deep, 2" high. It is built out of standard nominal 1" poplar (actual 3/4"). I will dado a 3/4" groove in the sides of each drawer to accept a 11/16" rail that I will attach to the case sides. So far so good. My wife want to be able to take the drawers completely out of the case to load and clean them. No problem. However, she doesn't want the draws to come out accidentally. That is they need to have some sort of "catch" or stop to keep them in the case unless she does something to take them out.
I am trying to figure out how to design such a mechanism. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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A simple solution, if your cabinet utilizes face frames, is to band saw a shape like a comma. Drill a small hole for a screw in the wider part. Locate it on the inside back of the drawer so that when the "comma" is on it's side, it's even with the top edge of the drawer and so that when it's turned, the heavy part of the "comma" will engage the back side of the face frame over the drawer.
Another way is to cut a 2" circle with a hole saw and then band saw it in half. Align the flat side with the top of the drawer back. Locate the screw hole and drill the hole. Turn it so the curved side is up to lock.
Gene
 

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Old School
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Similar to Gene's idea is to mount a turn stop lever at the top edge of the back of the drawer that rotates towards the cabinet side. Then mount a stop above the drawer side on the cabinet wall where you want the drawer to stop. This works well when there is a bank of drawers or there is no face frame above the drawer.






 

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I take it you're not interested in adding slides to the drawers? There are plenty of "locking" slides that use a push button or lever type lock... I like the woodworking ideas better than slides (more elegant) but I thought I'd throw the option out there as well.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Do exactly what you are planning with the dado in the sides for the drawer guide/slide. Make the back so that it catches on the top of the face frame. By adjusting the length of the slide rails the drawer will stay put until the front of the drawer is tilted up so that the back will clear the face frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
great ideas

I like the last idea. Unfortunately I have already cut the four sides of the draws. So I am going to go with the half circle idea. The question is: What is to keep the half circle turn up? Just friction of the screw? I also think I will use a Forster bit to cut enough of a depression in the drawer side to make the half circle almost flush with the side.

I don't quite understand Gene's suggestion regarding the comma. If he would like to send a picture it would be appreciated.
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I like the last idea. Unfortunately I have already cut the four sides of the draws. So I am going to go with the half circle idea. The question is: What is to keep the half circle turn up? Just friction of the screw? I also think I will use a Forster bit to cut enough of a depression in the drawer side to make the half circle almost flush with the side.

I don't quite understand Gene's suggestion regarding the comma. If he would like to send a picture it would be appreciated.
[email protected]
Imagine one half of the Ying&Yang symbol.
If you are referring to my suggestion re: the 1/2 circle. It's mounted to the inside of the drawer back. No relief needed. And yes, you'd tighten the screw so that it's just a little hard to turn. Friction will keep it in place.
 
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Howard I just had a similar project with a similar dilemma. I cut a square notch in the top edge of the back of my drawers and then added a turn block on the rail at the front of the cabinet. It has a positive 90 degree stop in both directions. It is screwed in place and has an easy operation. It works pretty well and it wasn’t difficult to engineer or build and it didn't take a lot of time to make it.
Good luck with your project
 

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