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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,
I just finished staining my new red oak interior doors. I used old masters wiping stain. I first wiped the doors with water, and sanded 150 to 220.
For the most part the stain looks pretty darn good for my first time staining, except for these light spots on a couple of the doors.

I don't know if maybe there is some glue or something that I couldn't see clogging the pores in those spots or maybe something else.
I'm looking for advise on how to proceed and try and make these less noticeable.

I plan on spraying dewaxed shellac to seal the doors.

Thanks for your help!



 

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I would have wiped with mineral spirits it will show if there is glue on the wood. How to minimize them someone else will have to chime in.

George
 

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We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

The light spots could be glue, sweat, or other contaminants. I don't pre wet wood to raise the grain. IMO, that's a waste of time. I don't know how long you waited to apply the stain after wetting, but the light spots could be from water.

I would stop sanding at 180x. On Red Oak, 220x is too smooth IMO. At this stage those areas need to be sanded out. Why are you applying shellac? What is your planned topcoat?









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Discussion Starter · #4 ·


We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

The light spots could be glue, sweat, or other contaminants. I don't pre wet wood to raise the grain. IMO, that's a waste of time. I don't know how long you waited to apply the stain after wetting, but the light spots could be from water.

I would stop sanding at 180x. On Red Oak, 220x is too smooth IMO. At this stage those areas need to be sanded out. Why are you applying shellac? What is your planned topcoat?









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I like the warm tone that the shellac gave it but I wasn't sure yet what to use as a top coat yet. Feel free to give suggestions. I waited a couple hrs after wiping with wet cloth until it was dry before staining.

I wish I knew the mineral spirit trick before I stained. I am new to finishing woodwork, learning as I go. I'm also building a bar and a built in bookcase / entertainment center as well and will be finishing that also the same color as the door. ( did a full basement remodel )

Thanks for the tips, I will update my profile.
-Joel
 

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It looks like glue stains to me too. When you build anything and see glue ooze out if you would wash the glue off with a wet rag it would prevents most of the spots from happening. Those on the panels look like you might have had a little glue on your hands and touched the doors. The only way to find accidental glue stains is to wipe the wood with a solvent like George said.

The easiest way for you to fix the spots is to sand the doors again and re-stain them. You would need quite a bit of finishing experience to use touch up markers to get the color right for that many spots.
 

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It looks like glue stains to me too. When you build anything and see glue ooze out if you would wash the glue off with a wet rag it would prevents most of the spots from happening.
I read and have tried Acetone to remove the glue when it is wet and it works better than water.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone, while I didn't build the doors I know to check for glue first. I will sand and restain
 

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I read and have tried Acetone to remove the glue when it is wet and it works better than water.

George
If acetone works I would imagine lacquer thinner would also. I just have always kept a buck of water and a rag handy when ever I assembly anything. The water may raise the grain a little but it has to be sanded anyway after assembly.
 
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