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Howdy MasterSpinter,

Being a retired Architect and an (almost) degree'd Engineer I might be able to make a suggestion but...need a wee bit more specifics on the items parameters.

Q?...multiple sliding mechanisms, or just one? How are they actuated, air, pneumatic or manual? Can it be operated in a horizontal position? What are it's max/min opening/closing dimensions?


Need more information to put my Inventors hat on...... :smartass:



Buck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
USMC_Buckaroo said:
Howdy MasterSpinter, Being a retired Architect and an (almost) degree'd Engineer I might be able to make a suggestion but...need a wee bit more specifics on the items parameters. Q?...multiple sliding mechanisms, or just one? How are they actuated, air, pneumatic or manual? Can it be operated in a horizontal position? What are it's max/min opening/closing dimensions? Need more information to put my Inventors hat on...... :smartass: Buck.
Great. I will measure when I get home. It is manual. I might remove where the tube attached to. Has a counter weight inside and the track in the front. L shape on both sides bearing in the track. I believe it a tad over 6ft. Probably 8 in square
 

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How precise is the sliding mechanism? After seeing that slab in the background of the first photo, I'm imagining an arm of some sort that extends perpendicular to the track. You could set up the new arm to hold your router and use it as a router planing jig for slabs? Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
captainawesome said:
How precise is the sliding mechanism? After seeing that slab in the background of the first photo, I'm imagining an arm of some sort that extends perpendicular to the track. You could set up the new arm to hold your router and use it as a router planing jig for slabs? Just a thought.
That was the direction I was thinking also.
 

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captainawesome said:
This is going to be VERY cool! I just wish you were closer to my location so I could see it in person! I'm no expert, but I've done my fair share of welding and fabricating. Let me know if there is anyway I can assist.
That would be cool. Wish you did live closer.
 

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"...a router planing jig for slabs..."


That was indeed one of my initial leans which prompted my "how many tracks" query. You'd be surprised how many affecting ingredients are created once a mechanism 'moves'...weight distribution/redistribution, long term wear (tracks/bearings/mountings), etc, etc.
Without significant modification the unit is limited to the 'X' axis (or 'Y' depending upon mounting) Mounting the "x-ray tube stand" horizontal, removing the end caps and replacing with multi-wheeled trucks (I've used old roller blade wheels) and placed on a set of tracks on either side (I've used simple aluminium 1" x 1" angle stock) and you've now created your 'Y' axis, sliding the "tube stand" back and forth along the 'V' track of the aluminium angle.

This is quite similar to the router copy-carver I'm building out in the shop, only I had to design and build mine from scratch (unfortunately for me, no x-ray tube stands were available ; - ) ).

So, utilizing only the 'X' and 'Y' axis you could indeed accomplish a 'planing jig'. Just mount an old Saf-T-planer on there and away you go!

I didn't realize it was 6' tall, but I should have known that by simply noticing the standard 6' step ladder in the background...silly me. Anyways, another factor to consider (especially if you are considering some of the suggestions made so far) is space considerations...if you were to lay this thing on it's side, and then build front-to-back tracks for the 'Y' axis, you would have a rather healthy footprint requirement in your shop.

But, enough yakkin' for now for me, captainawesome has some dandy suggestions! :thumbsup:


Regards,


Buck. :cowboy:


Postscript: On an additional note, and as possible 'food for thought' assuming you have unlimited shop space and a desire to potentially consider adding a 'Z' access to your creation I submit this pic of a pantograph apparatus which would allow you to do more than work on flat work pieces......further, the pantograph, or parallelogram-style arrangement would also accomplish the task of always maintaining a zero orientation to your work piece (always maintaining a 90 degree relationship, no matter the height of your 'Z' axis)...but, you'd need a HELLUVA counterwieght!!




...just thought that extra bit might be helpful. ;)


Postscript # II: An afterthought ( I get LOTS of these) regarding the potential counterweight issue...to offset the required size of the counterweight needed, and to assist with the general operation of the machine you could just install a set of hooked torsion coils on either end of the 'X' axis pivot points. The only 'science' at that point would be determining the needed torsion spring 'rate' per degree of radial 'travel'....

Formula:


Rate Per 360 Degrees
(R) = Ed^4 / 10.8 DN


Explanation of Symbols:

d = wire size (inches)
D = Mean Diameter (inches)
N = Number of active coils
R = Rate per 360 degrees
S = Stress (lbs / square in)
P = Load (lbs)
M = Moment (inch-lbs)
D / d = Index correction



HTH.
 
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