Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After tipping the lathe over it’s obvious the original stand won’t work With the copier attached. I have several sheets of melamine in the rack. Any suggestions on what you have seen that would be worth having with storage?
Hood Wood Floor Automotive exterior Automotive tire
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Heavy is easy. But it will need lots of storage.

I’ve got an 8/4 top but I may have to make a longer one. ive got a lot of 8/4 Ash and Hickory I may try and use for the frame..
 

·
The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
My lathe stand is bonded to the basement walls and floor. Can't possibly knock it over and it has the mass of the entire concrete foundation to quell any vibration. I know, not possible for many folks.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I always said if I stopped running a cabinet business I'd change my shop to a hobby shop
The time has come. The furnace guy called this morning and said he would install tomorrow, then i can move the rack..
Wood Floor Shelving Shelf Hardwood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I did this a couple of years ago for my mini lathe. I like having the sharpening lathe on the bench and the storage below for tools and supplies. It is on casters as well so i can move it when needed. the lathe was elevated just a bit to provide clearance for the Oneway Vari-Grind sharpening jig. Stability has not been a problem with it.
Wood Tool Machine tool Gas Engineering
\

Wood Motor vehicle Machine tool Gas Machine


Engineering Gas Machine Machine tool Cabinetry


Motor vehicle Automotive tire Table Automotive design Office equipment
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thx Gary..After almost flipping the lathe I realized the lathe is front heavy..May not be a problem with a new stand, but I’m going to keep it in mind..

Looking in the rack I have 2 sheets of white melamine, 3-4 sheets of MDF Sapele. I think I have one sheet of MDF Birch…

similiar…
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,934 Posts
I just got an idea. How about fold-out wings to be swung outward when turning? If lathe is on wheels like mine, the fold-outs can have adjustable feet to drop down.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just got an idea. How about fold-out wings to be swung outward when turning? If lathe is on wheels like mine, the fold-outs can have adjustable feet to drop down.
That's something worth looking into.. Next step is to clear out the two areas with the plywood cutoffs...After that I can see what my space looks like...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I just got an idea. How about fold-out wings to be swung outward when turning? If lathe is on wheels like mine, the fold-outs can have adjustable feet to drop down.
Tony,
I did something like I think you are describing. I can't tell you how many times I tripped on them! The first version was just short wings that flipped out, call them feet. After tripping a bunch of times, I redid them so that they came up the side of the of the stand to the top. That seemed to help, it was like standing inside a "U." I made the tall ones where they slid out so I could have something close to the sides of the stand and not worry about swinging the wings out.

I guess it's just me. I had a jointer with a stand with legs came out at an angle. I got my feet caught on those a lot.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tony,
I did something like I think you are describing. I can't tell you how many times I tripped on them! The first version was just short wings that flipped out, call them feet. After tripping a bunch of times, I redid them so that they came up the side of the of the stand to the top. That seemed to help, it was like standing inside a "U." I made the tall ones where they slid out so I could have something close to the sides of the stand and not worry about swinging the wings out.

I guess it's just me. I had a jointer with a stand with legs came out at an angle. I got my feet caught on those a lot.
Woodworking Wolf if you were in my shop you would be tripping on everything. When I worked at the commercial shop and he retired he gave me his lumber pile. Mahagany, Sapele, etc. There are exotics in there I haven't seen in 10 years. After this I went to the furniture company my shop sat still and became more a collection of lumber and tools I bought over the years. I can with a little clean up work on projects, but not near the production I once was..

The lathe with the copier adds additional weight to the front which with the extension Tony B. Mentioned may cure the problem..Maybe something that slides out with a pin?
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,291 Posts
Tony,
I did something like I think you are describing. I can't tell you how many times I tripped on them! The first version was just short wings that flipped out, call them feet. After tripping a bunch of times, I redid them so that they came up the side of the of the stand to the top. That seemed to help, it was like standing inside a "U." I made the tall ones where they slid out so I could have something close to the sides of the stand and not worry about swinging the wings out.

I guess it's just me. I had a jointer with a stand with legs came out at an angle. I got my feet caught on those a lot.
leg extensions can:
Swing out - requires clearance space on either side.
Slide out - no space required on the sides.
Hinge or pivot down - easiest.
Be loose and attached with pins - also easy requires storage.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I just got an idea. How about fold-out wings to be swung outward when turning? If lathe is on wheels like mine, the fold-outs can have adjustable feet to drop down.
I think this would be the ticket. With a shrinking workshop, With moveable legs I would be able to make it rather narrow and yet pull,them out when needed.. I'll have to work the detail out..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,934 Posts
I havent made any extension legs yet, swing-out or otherwise. If the 'swingouts are at at outward angle away from the center on both sides, that should work. Smaller bowls should not tip a lathe over under normal conditions so if you did have swing-out/slide-outs you wouldnt be using them all of the time. once you swing your log close to a balancing point, you could fold the legs back in.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
7,922 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
It will be pretty easy. Wife decided to put he grand daughter in preschool in June. From 8-12 This is going to mess up papa's fishing for a month and her will be my helper around the house fixing a window, door and from porch rail.. I'm gonna have to get her a tool belt...
 

·
Thumb Nailer
Joined
·
2,857 Posts
Looks like maybe a Central Machinery 34706 lathe. The bed, head and all are great. The stand is too thin...

Whatever you do, make your stand HEAVY. I am setting up mine out of 2x stock with a ballast box on the bottom housing [email protected] bags of quickcrete. I have old drawers for kitchen cabinets that will be installed (4 of them) for turning tools storage...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
Greater stability in a small footprint can be obtained by adding ballast to the base. This will be beneficial not only in lowering the center of gravity (greater tip resistance) but also reducing the overall vibration of imbalanced work (rough stock, off center turnings, material variations in density, etc) My lathe stand itself weighs 150 lbs and I have 300lbs of ballast in the base of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Would securely anchoring it to the floor and wall provide a similar benefit to ballast? I've been thinking of doing that with a lathe in my dad's workshop. He built a nice stand for it with storage, but it would be difficult to add weight to it. It doesn't need to be moved and it is up against a wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
Would securely anchoring it to the floor and wall provide a similar benefit to ballast?
Yes, anchoring the lathe would be the next best thing. The very best ballast in terms of vibration absorption, is a loose ballast, such as sandbags.

Anchoring the lathe transfers the vibration, while a sand bag ballast absorbs the vibration. End result to the user is pretty much the same. Except anyone on the other side of the anchor wall, will be more aware of the late operation (due to the transfer of the energy into the wall)
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top