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I don't want to sell my set. I suppose the stock can be soaked in water, anything to soften the stock so it doesn't splinter when cutting. Only the part/surface needing threads would need to be "lubricated". I might test a piece in water. see how well it works and any affect on the stock, itself.

Yeah, long ago I had searched for large tap and die sets and found Dieter Schmid. I had tried hand carving threads and fail miserably. I saw one tutorial about soaking and the guy used mineral oil. My vises, the nuts, didn't need to be finished, so the oil was no issue.

Sonny
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Robert - First off, I have a few projects to make for myself then consider making them for sale after I get the list of components to work in a simple order. After seeing the projects on other forums with massive heads and handles and using hardwoods like walnut, cherry, etc. should be an attractive option over the ones presently listed online.
Also - to replace the rinky-dinky vise on the HF woodworking table. The table is okay for the hobbyist but the end vise is way, way below our standards. There's just so many projects that could benefit from a big beefy wood screw assembly.
(stay tuned)
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Wood Tool Wall Gas Plumbing

I've ended up getting the Taylor Tools 1.5" and it works great, is beefy, but the thread count seems too high.
Good point - now that I look at it more closely, and consider the turns needed to open and close the jaws just 4 inches might be a negative feature that most people don't want. I've also been toying with the idea of how to make a "quick release" like the metal vises have. (I'll have to put the 1-1/2" version on hold for now just because of the high [6-TPI] thread count).
Thanks for the info.
oh - you said you soaked the wood in linseed oil - did you mean boiled linseed oil or straight oil ??
 

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Robert - First off, I have a few projects to make for myself then consider making them for sale after I get the list of components to work in a simple order. After seeing the projects on other forums with massive heads and handles and using hardwoods like walnut, cherry, etc. should be an attractive option over the ones presently listed online.
Also - to replace the rinky-dinky vise on the HF woodworking table. The table is okay for the hobbyist but the end vise is way, way below our standards. There's just so many projects that could benefit from a big beefy wood screw assembly.
(stay tuned)
To my simple mind, it would seem like the nut/threaded body would be the challenge.
I can't envision an easy way to create the female threaded portion other than a "tap".
And a tap doesn't seem like it would an easy project, unless I'm over thinking it?

A found this comprehensive series on You Tube;


 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
To my simple mind, it would seem like the nut/threaded body would be the challenge.
I can't envision an easy way to create the female threaded portion other than a "tap".
And a tap doesn't seem like it would an easy project, unless I'm over thinking it?
No, you are not over thinking it - to make the two parts that mate together perfectly takes a certain amount of skill and tools. The people on YouTube make the "threading box" without thinking about the female thread (tap). I have no enterest in even trying to make the tools. I just heard back from my friend with the machine shop and they no longer do lathe work. Just fabricating and welding of metal stuff. And, a whole LOT of projects for Disney (Orlando).
So - it will be patience and searching until I come down to the end of my rope and swing for the German one (which has two cutters) and is big bucks. BUT - has the potential of paying for itself over time. (that is my defense, and I'm sticking to it).
There is no way you can do this with a 6-TPI thread.
 

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I wonder if it would work to use a metal cutting set on wood.

The male end could be done on a metal lathe. The tap, you may have to get a machinist to fabricate. Depending on the project that might also be possible on a lathe if the part would fit the chuck
I had a 2.25 inch x 8 TPI tap for my SouthBend metal lathe. I tapped a few pieces wooden planks to use as face plates to try to use the lathe for wood as well.. The tap's cutting edges just weren't right for cuttng threads across the grain, Oh they worked fair, using a metal lathe for wood turning is a bad idea all round.
 

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oh boy. i went down the rabbit hole...
i know john doesn't want to make his own threading equipment, but what the heck 🤷‍♂️
it's all in russian, so you can't understand anything unless you speak russian
with the nut video i had no idea what he was doing until towards the end
but you can't argue with the guys dedication to making wood nut and threads with machines
he uses a router to do do everything, once the jigs are made

Abacus Musical instrument Goggles Engineering Sunglasses


wood threaded rod


4 piece nut

 

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I only found about soaking the set in mineral oil this week - Never heard of it before. Now, I'm wondering how you get the oil out of the wood if you wanted to stain or finish the pieces
For bending wood it's the heat not the water or steam that does the trick. For thread cutting maybe put the wood in a 180F etc oven overnight?
 

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Further notes:
Not sure how well you can see it.... this is one of the broken nuts from one of my vises. The hole is offset, not centered on the block of wood. For your nut making, drill your hole in the center of your over-sized block, then trim your block as per any offset and outer dimensions you'd need. Also, in the previous pics, note the grain of wood relative to the direction of the hole.
https://flic.kr/p/2jZnPbx
I didn't/don't have a *drill bit large enough for drilling the initial hole... other than an adjustable brace bit, to drill the proper size initial hole.
https://flic.kr/p/2jYKkXB
Sonny
 

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oh boy. i went down the rabbit hole...
i know john doesn't want to make his own threading equipment, but what the heck 🤷‍♂️
it's all in russian, so you can't understand anything unless you speak russian
with the nut video i had no idea what he was doing until towards the end
but you can't argue with the guys dedication to making wood nut and threads with machines
he uses a router to do do everything, once the jigs are made
Yes, looks good, BUT those are ACME threads, only allowed in metal working ....... ;)
 

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Take a look at woodsmithplans.com. Enter canister in the search box. The project at the top of the list (first picture) requires plans for fixtures to make threads on a large threaded cover for a canister, and for the threads in the box itself. It does use an ACME threaded rod to translate the thread pitch. Maybe this could be tweeted for your project. I have a set of directions here somewhere, but I never got to making them. They had an episode that showed the details. That was 2-3 years ago
 

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Hi John,

Sorry, I cannot help with your die/tap search. My maximum diameter set is 1-1/2 inches.

However, in regard to your query on staining/finishing wood after soaking it in oil, here’s what I would try:

1- As a test item, use a piece of each wood stock species that you intend to use for your project. Then, using an oil-based stain only, apply stain to the entire wood test
pieces.

2- Soak the pre-stained piece(s) in the mineral oil or raw linseed oil for your desired period (boiled linseed oil leaves a sticky residue when dry). When the time’s up, wipe the surface very dry with a rag. If the stain lightens after wiping, apply another coat to darken and re-wipe. When the colortone is adequate, wipe-on a coat of sanding sealer over the stained surface and let it dry (I always use de-waxed shellac, such as Zinsser Sealcoat). Finally, apply your finish topcoat, if using. You can also try the method, along with using an available tap/die set for the test. Doing so, will allow viewing of the full results on your intended project.

I’ve never tried this method on a tap/die project where soaking was used. But, after once reading a FWW article about finishes that will adhere to oily woods (Rosewood in my case), the instructions worked well for me. To overcome an adhesion problem, I wiped on 1 coat of Sealcoat on a pre-stained surface, followed by a clear coat finish. This eliminated any adhesion problems. The same article may also help you - at least with some of your finishing question.

In my opinion, staining before soaking, should not affect the pre-stain application because mineral oil is not a solvent - and I hope that I’m not proven wrong (after a lengthy soaking). Even when working portions of the wood with a tap or die after staining, there should still be enough oil left in the soaked wood (especially from the ends) to help with any needed lubrication. I'd at least give it a try.

Through my FWW site subscription, I downloaded the article mentioned above. The PDF is included with this message. Instructions highlight using oil-based finishes only, to assist with their adhesion. It may not fully help with your question, but the reading is another good learning tool.

Best of luck!

- Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
A hearty shout-out to SonnyAgain for his invaluable information as he actually has what I'm looking for and answered all my questions and concerns. Like any quality tool that you guys look for, you compare capabilities, need vs want, and price. This is what I am budgeting for in the very near future.
Thanks Sonny.
Product Camera lens Lens Line Camera accessory


And to all the other responders, thank you for your time and efforts.
 

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A hearty shout-out to SonnyAgain for his invaluable information as he actually has what I'm looking for and answered all my questions and concerns. Like any quality tool that you guys look for, you compare capabilities, need vs want, and price. This is what I am budgeting for in the very near future.
Thanks Sonny.
View attachment 444795

And to all the other responders, thank you for your time and efforts.
I applaud your perseverance, with taking many hours to research a topic. My firm belief is that if you need and want something badly enough, eventually you will get it.
I also agree, that your future purchase of a quality tool will eventually pay for itself.

- Bob
 

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There is a two man machine shop next door to my shop. The guy than runs the place can make just about anything from metal using "old school" equipment. (No cnc is his shop) I briefly explained what Jon is looking to do. Evidently to make a 1.75" tap and die for wood isn't difficult however.....his rough estimate is $1,000.00, 8 hours of shop time.
 
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