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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been getting back into furniture repair and since I moved to Florida the humidity is killing my sanding sealer. It blushes horribly. I'm working out of my garage shop and have no air conditioning in it. I am use to Mohawk products, and their sealer is prone to this. What can I do to overcome this issue? I have seen a product in Mohawks catalog that is suppose to remove the moisture from the product after the sealer is applied but don't know how well it works.
Any help??
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought I saw this mentioned before right after posted it. I work with spray cans not guns. Mostly touch up work but I do need to do a table top this coming week. I will try the Mohawk product to see if it helps. I might even go with a urethane product. Not sure yet. I need to PU the table today. I will see what it looks like and if I can change the finish for the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I picked up a couple of cans of No-Blush today and did the table. It worked. No blush after the sealer and no blush after the satin. I'm happy. Thanks for the help. :thumbsup:
 

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Just a quick word: Finishes that are advertised and/or sold as "water-based" are not, in fact, water based. They are "water borne".

~ Peter
 

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Just a quick word: Finishes that are advertised and/or sold as "water-based" are not, in fact, water based. They are "water borne".
~ Peter

Just a quick word about finishes. Finishes that are advertised and/or sold are identified by the "base". The most popular and ones pertinent to woodworking are:

Alcohol - Shellac
Acetone - (lacquer thinner) - Lacquer
Mineral Spirits - (paint thinner) - Oil Base
Water - Water based finishes - paints and topcoats

The reference to "base" includes the chemical for its reduction and cleanup. The reference to "water based" products as "waterborne" is used in the description and in marketing.

Descriptions for the usage of that terminology for example are here, and here.

The common usage for "waterbased finishes" is more widely used than "waterborne". The chemical characteristics of it's properties lends to the use of the term "waterborne" which can be read at this Rocklers site.

This is a little like hair splittin'.
 

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I eliminate blushing when spraying lacquer in my high humid location in one of two ways.
1 - heat the lacquer before spraying
2 - add a retarder which is simply another solvent but one with slow evaporating rate.
 

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"Just a quick word about finishes. Finishes that are advertised and/or sold are identified by the "base""

No, not really, they are identified by solvent, which is erroneously called "base". Even so the term "waterborne" is more accurate than "water based" since the finish is not dissolved in water but it is an emulsion, unlike the previously mentioned finishes that are completely miscible with their appropriate solvent. Strictly speaking, finishes that use water as a carrier instead of as a solvent should be called emulsified finishes.
Now if you could just convince all the manufacturers to change their labels.:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:








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I eliminate blushing when spraying lacquer in my high humid location in one of two ways.
1 - heat the lacquer before spraying
2 - add a retarder which is simply another solvent but one with slow evaporating rate.

I am in a high humidity area too and I overcome the blushing problem when spraying laquer by adding a retarder. I also put a few drops of fish rye reducer to a quart of laquer because in high humidity climates I have had a problem with fish eye as well. Be very Very careful about heating laquer as the laquer thinner for reducing the laquer has a very low flash temp that I am not sure but would considerate close to that of gasoline. VERY DANGEROUS
 

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I am in a high humidity area too and I overcome the blushing problem when spraying laquer by adding a retarder. I also put a few drops of fish rye reducer to a quart of laquer because in high humidity climates I have had a problem with fish eye as well. Be very Very careful about heating laquer as the laquer thinner for reducing the laquer has a very low flash temp that I am not sure but would considerate close to that of gasoline. VERY DANGEROUS


If you are getting fish eye, you have contamination in your shop. It could be from waxes, or silicones of one type or another. Once contaminated it could be impossible to rid the area. You may be committed to using fish eye reducer.








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Be very Very careful about heating laquer as the laquer thinner for reducing the laquer has a very low flash temp that I am not sure but would considerate close to that of gasoline. VERY DANGEROUS

No flame used. I heat us a pan of water. Then put the lacquer in its container into the pan of warm water.
 
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