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Sawdust Creator
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8,046 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've done a few laminate projects before, and never really noticed a problem.....but recently have had two where after I was done noticed the laminate delaminating...


So for example, I built an extension on my tablesaw out of MDF with a maple frame....utilized contact cement on both the MDF and the laminate and then after it dried, used a j roller to press it down....came back a few days later to bevel the edge and the laminate was loose at the edge. Super glue and a clamp fixed it....but I know now that the bond was not sufficient....


So....am I missing a step? Not using enough contact cement? Just unlucky?

I've got a router table top in the works and really don't want any trouble with this one.
 

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bzguy
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581 Posts
For commercial work I put it on thick, two coats with a paintbrush with ample drying time between.
Do not stick together until the surfaces do not feel sticky to your hands.
Here are some laminate topped, (Plywood substrate, pine framed) picnic tables that actually stand up to the driving rains.
http://flic.kr/p/jddXJZ

 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ambient temperature was 62-64 degrees....dap contact cement which by the smell alone I'd guess was solvent based. The odd part to me is that most of it adhered fine....
 

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Old School
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24,017 Posts
Ambient temperature was 62-64 degrees....dap contact cement which by the smell alone I'd guess was solvent based. The odd part to me is that most of it adhered fine....
Temperature should be above 65 degrees. The back of the laminate only needs one good application...it's not that porous. The MDF should take two. Allow the first to dry, and apply the second. The surfaces have about an hour of open time, and can feel slightly tacky to dry before laminating.

If you used waterbase, check the directions for ambient temperature application, and it takes a lot longer for it to flash off dry.

With either, stir the can well before using.






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I have found that I have to apply multiple coats of contact cement that I have purchased from my home center to get the appropriate amount of adhesive coverage. The viscosity seems a whole lot thinner than the same brand adhesive I purchase from a commercial flooring distributer even though it is labeled "brush grade".

The issue sounds like it is related to the amount of adhesive or contamination from dust or something similar, which I am sure you guarded against.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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8,046 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well.....I think it probably comes down to not having used enough. I'll be laminating my router table top soon and will see if this fixes my issues
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I've not had good results with the water based stuff. (Green can)

I wind up using the red can and as soon is the last corner applied is tack free, they are joined.
 

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MDF is pressed when it is manufactured. Sometimes the formaldehyde gets really thick on the surface and interferes with paint and adhesives. I normally sand MDF to make sure the surface is free of excess formaldehyde.
 
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