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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, so the wife is heading out of town next weekend and I plan on remodeling my kitchen. I was curious if its easier to take apart my existing cabinet doors and replace them with glass, or if I should just make them myself and put glass in them.

I am trying to make my kitchen more modern. I am going to go with dark lowers and white painted upper cabinets with semi see through glass doors. My plan is to add some crown molding on the top of the L shaped kitchen along with my new cabinets I will be building in the nook.

Here is a picture of the cabinets as of today.

I also need to finish building my uppers in the recessed nook I built.

The last picture is a good example of the two tone I am going for.
 

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Old School
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I wouldn't plan on taking the doors apart and then reassembly. If the existing panel is a thin one like ¼", and it rides in a groove, you could cut/rout the outer groove wall, and remove the panel and replace with glass.

There are several ways to install the glass. You could use a small bead of GE Silicone II. Or, you could use screw on panel retainers. Or, you could use/make a small moulding to run the perimeter of the glass and mount it to the frame. You could use small nails. This will trim the inside very nicely. What's important is to allow the glass to be removable, in case it needs to be replaced.






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I have never seen a two tone kitchen. It may look OK, but I would have my doubts. However, if you do not ever intend to sell the house it should not matter.

As cabinetman says, it would be easier to start from scratch building new doors.

George
 

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I have never seen a two tone kitchen. It may look OK, but I would have my doubts. However, if you do not ever intend to sell the house it should not matter.

As cabinetman says, it would be easier to start from scratch building new doors.

George
Seems to me it would be easier to retro-fit than to rebuild...
 

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I haven't done it, but it should be easy to make a router jig that you can put over each door and run the router along it to cut away the back part of the groove to expose the wood panel and remove it. This would also create a clean edge for installing the glass. That seems like a lot less work than making a whole set of doors. Outwater Plastics company sells rubber retainer strips and lots of clips for holding the glass in. Here is a link to their catalog...
http://www.outwatercatalogs.com/lg_...Vol_42/page/289/highlight/glass door retainer
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the info. I have a router jig I can use to cut the panel out. I think I will go that route. I plan on using frosted glass depending on cost. This week I will be building the uppers for the nook and hopefully get them installed before the weekend so i can get the crown installed on my L shaped kitchen and work on painting the uppers this weekend. Thanks again.

Oh, the panels are 1/4" ply from the feel. Rather thin.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, plans changed.... I decided I would sand and prime first to see how much smoothing was needed as I need dry time for the mud. Good thing I started early! The cabinets are cheap, made out of particle board with laminate. The doors are real oak with 1/4" panels.

I always add color to my primer, this allows me to see imperfections in the wood a lot easier than standard white primer.

I was able to get the sanding and most the primer done on Monday. Today I put on the second coat, let it dry and then I started with the mud process to smooth out the cabinet imperfections. The mud process always looks bad the first go around, but it will be built upon. I usually do two to three coats of mud.

It's a work in progress, but it's coming along.

Still hoping to have the uppers done by this weekend.
 

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Oh my. I could cook up a storm in that kitchen.

I did the demolition for a total kitchen rebuild = "leave the paint on the walls. Everything else goes out." 3P Sunday, I swept the floor. Wires for the lights, pipe stubs for the sink & drain. Cabinet guy was there 8A Monday.

The key thing in the new design was the space for 3-4 people to do food prep without getting in eachother's way.
 

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Oh yeah. That has to be tedious for sure.
However, when spring comes and the K. is finished, you will have such a relaxing time in the new environment. Space to build food, space for people to visit. That is as good as it gets.
 

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Hey, AK guy: I'll bring the fixin's for those ribs. Great smoke ring.
Using homestead ratty apple tree at present, what you got?
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I used mesquite wood for those particular ribs. 3-2-1 method. I plan on using apple this summer and see how they turn out. The ribs were basted in "bone suckin sauce" about every 30 minutes. I also use an apple cider vinegar with special spice ingredients to give it some heat and flavor. Just starting to get into the whole BBQ scene. Last year was my first year using smoke. BBQ turns out 10 times better with smoke. That's for sure.

Smoked/BBQ turkey.... Mmmm. Sure was good.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Made a bunch of progress today. I managed to sand all the base cabinets down today, TSP them and start staining. They are already much darker than originally with one coat of stain. The prep work is always the worst... Really starting to see the kitchen come together with the two tone look. I managed to paint a few coats of paint on the upper doors today as well. Gonna sit back and enjoy a few beers as stuff drys and then start all over tomorrow...

Still hoping to get this done by Sunday. Im really going to be cutting it close.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I know everyone is thinking... Where are the pictures. Don't worry progress is being made. I got ambitious and decided to install under cabinet lighting as well.

Next is making the crown molding and bead board side panel for the end cabinet. Any suggestions?

Trying to have the kitchen done before Sunday evening before the wife gets home for a revealing.

Enough typing... Here is the current state.
 

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Under cabinet lighting is the greatest thing on dark & cold winter mornings. I put up a couple of single tube fluoros on timers, maybe 6 weeks ago. Sooooo nice to walk into a softly lit kitchen first thing in the morning. How else can I find the coffee pot?
 

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Nice spares. The 3-2-1 method is very helpful. Queing is also a hobby of mine. I would suggest not using mesquite for ribs though. Beef seems to do well with mesquite. Ribs seem to like apple most. I like to use apple with maybe a little hickory for mine. I like St. Louis cut spares like you have the most. Chicken and pork like fruit and nut woods. My preference is to use a dry rub on the ribs and maybe baste them with apple juice/ cider and seasoning mix. I use the sauce to dip only. But ,again, that's mine and familia'is preference. What do you use for a smoker? I have a couple of Big Green Eggs and love them.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks. They were all out of apple last year around the time I tried. I basically do the same method as you. I dry rub and then glaze with BBQ sauce every 30 minutes more for color...

No BBQ sauce at all. Good ribs shouldn't need sauce IMO.

Back on topic.... I stained the lowers and I am overall happy with the way they turned out but the one cabinet door is a little lighter than the rest. These were removed and done in the shop side by side so it's not the stain that's less dark.... It's the actual lighting in the kitchen. Should I stain it a tad darker to match, even though the light is causing the issue and not the finish?

Oh, I use the biggest traeger grill you can buy before stepping up to a pig or the like. I absolutely love it in the summer. In the winter it's hard to keep up to temp without wasting a lot of pellets. I keep debating on putting fire bricks in the cooker and a heat blanket.
 

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No BBQ sauce at all. Good ribs shouldn't need sauce IMO.

Back on topic.... I stained the lowers and I am overall happy with the way they turned out but the one cabinet door is a little lighter than the rest. These were removed and done in the shop side by side so it's not the stain that's less dark.... It's the actual lighting in the kitchen. Should I stain it a tad darker to match, even though the light is causing the issue and not the finish?

Oh, I use the biggest traeger grill you can buy before stepping up to a pig or the like. I absolutely love it in the summer. In the winter it's hard to keep up to temp without wasting a lot of pellets. I keep debating on putting fire bricks in the cooker and a heat blanket.
The bold I marked is the absolute truth.

Nice work on the food and the cabinets.
 
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