Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for everyone who's done kitchen cabinets. I get how the drawer slides go on in a frameless cabinet but I'm looking to maybe do the kitchen over. I want to build cabinets with frames and have the doors flush with the face frames. Maybe I missed something but can someone explain to me how the slides and doors need to be hinged with face frames and how the slides go in?

If I don't make the drawers and doors will sub them out to maybe Waltzcraft or someone near by.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Question for everyone who's done kitchen cabinets. I get how the drawer slides go on in a frameless cabinet but I'm looking to maybe do the kitchen over. I want to build cabinets with frames and have the doors flush with the face frames. Maybe I missed something but can someone explain to me how the slides and doors need to be hinged with face frames and how the slides go in?

If I don't make the drawers and doors will sub them out to maybe Waltzcraft or someone near by.
For the doors, you can use full inset euro hinges. For the drawers, apply spacer pieces to be flush with the edge of the face frame. IOW, the cabinet member must mount flush to the face frame. The cabinet member slides are set back the thickness of the drawer front...plus 1/32", to allow for adjustment.




.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,821 Posts
if the doors are full inset, you may consider getting them slightly oversized to allow fitting into the existing openings for a nice fit. on the slides look for (blum) slides that have adjustment capability. a lot easier to fit up flush
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
if the doors are full inset, you may consider getting them slightly oversized to allow fitting into the existing openings for a nice fit. on the slides look for (blum) slides that have adjustment capability. a lot easier to fit up flush
I've tried many brands of full extension drawer slides, and Blum being one of the brands that are high priced. I haven't found any discernible differences in the brands, even the economy types.

The drawer member usually has an up/down, and a front/back set of adjustment holes. The cabinet member usually has a front/back set of adjustment holes.






.
 

·
Old Methane Gas Cloud
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Euro style hinges can be purchased to fit most overlay door styles. The mounting bracket attaches to the side of the face frame.

The drawer slides that I used (Blum) were attached to the side of the face frame and a floater. In my case the floater was a piece of Melamine with a no clearance fit inside the cabinet carcass.

The floater was attached to the face frame with a few nails shot through the frame. Then the slides were installed and the drawer was made to operate smoothly. Finally a few nails were shot through the cabinet back or back pine to anchor the rear of the floater when the drawer was in place and closed.

Everything considered, the face frame usually overlays the cabinet carcass by about 3/4" and the floater of 3/4" Melamine makes for a perfect fit. Also, absolute precision in placing the front of the floater is not too important but the back of the floater just sort of moves into perfect alignment when the drawer is closed.

BTW - Most significant others prefer the Melamine interior of a cabinet. It is easier to clean and never needs to be painted.

The gentleman that taught the class was a shop owner and believed that materials were cheaper than labor. (Sort of like computers, hardware is cheap but software is expensive.)
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
In case you should ask :)smile:), for a single cabinet I make the face frame flush with the outsides of the ends. For multiple cabinets (those that are next to each other, I have a method for installing face frames, making them flush to each other, and simplifies their installation.

When installing multiple cabinets, there's the tedious task of getting the face frames to line up flush. This is a tip that may be of some help. For example if you have three upper cabinets each having their own face frame call the first "A", the second "B", and the third "C". If you've installed the face frame on the cabinets, lay them on their backs and line them up so the face frames are as close to flush as possible. Start with "A" and "B". Clamp the two FF's together. From whichever side you are comfortable drilling and screwing, drill pilot holes and countersink in at least three places (top, middle, bottom) from one FF into the other. Make sure the holes are not drilled where hinges will be installed. Insert screws that will be shorter by 1/4" to 1/2" than the ones you will use when installing. Bump screws in tight. Remove clamps. Do the final scraping or sanding on the two FF's at once so they are flat and even. Then go to the "B" and "C" cabinets and do the same thing, etc.

When installing, after placing them where they are to go and leveling them, screw cabinets to the wall, but not up tight. Using the slightly longer screws, align the FF's, clamp, and insert screws into the same holes and bump tight. Then do the final tightening of the cabinets to the wall. If the wall is not flat,(how many are?) shimming the back of the cabinets may be necessary, so that there is no strain on the FF's. This method helps make final alignment easier.






.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top