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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok ……. Serious mechanical brain fart. I’m trying to figure out how to install the zero clearance throat plate I picked up on Etsy. (Excellent reviews specifically for this tablesaw). I’m pretty sure that the paws need to come off the riving knife in order to drop the new throat plate into position. I can’t figure out how to take the paws off. The manual doesn’t mention it. I don’t want to force it and bend/break something. Anyone know a secret? I’m sure I’m overlooking the obvious.

Delta 36-725
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Maybe just extend the existing riving knife slot to the end?
 
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CharleyL
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Interesting! Do that and the insert may fall apart after cutting the blade slot since there may end up being little to no material left between the blade kerf and the splitter / riving knife. Only the front area ahead of the blade will likely still be holding it together. That looks like a splitter rather than a riving knife. Does it rise and fall with the blade lift adjustment or remain stationary with vertical blade adjustment and only tilt with the blade angle adjustment?

What does the original saw insert look like for that saw? I'm not very familiar with your Delta saw. My Unisaw is a mid 1980's saw. Does the splitter / riving knife easily plug in and pull out from above the table? Most splitters / riving knives of similar design are bolted tight to the blade mechanism below the insert. How does your splitter / riving knife attach to that saw?

The Delta accessory Pop-Up Splitter on my Unisaw is permanently attached below the saw table, and resides below the table insert. A slot through the back edge of my table insert allows me to remove the insert, lift the splitter up into place and then slide the insert back into place with this extended slot through the rear edge of the insert fitting around the splitter. I reverse the process to push the splitter back down and out of the way when I won't be using it. Unless that splitter just plugs in somehow to attach it through and below the insert, I can't see how this splitter and insert combination works, and it appears way too close to the blade to work like my splitter. Most, if not all, riving knives don't have anti-kickback pawls, so it looks to be a splitter and not a riving knife. Please post some more pictures and provide more details about your saw and the splitter. I am very curious.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Charlie-You are right. It is probably a splitter. It raises and lowers with the blade. I’m not really sure what the difference would be in practical terms. The original throat plate has a long slit that continues from the front of the blade to the back of the splitter which is about 80% of the length. Since it is aluminum, that large slit doesn’t compromise the structural integrity. I’m afraid to use that same length slit with the less rigid fiberboard zero clearance throat plate.

The splitter attaches by inserting into a housing that is tightened using a lever that compresses two detents into holes on the splitter. It is not bolted like the one on my Craftsman table saw.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That design is on multiple saws. In your photo you can see the bright finish of one end of the shaft that holds the paws in place. Press in the other end of the shaft and it will release.
I will have to try pushing in on that again, tomorrow . I tried earlier but my carpal tunnel has robbed me of most hand strength these days. Looking at it again, the opposite side does look like it may be held in place by a spring clip. I’ve only had the saw a few months so I’m still getting acquainted. And, everything is still pretty tight. Thanks.
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If needed, you can always take the riving knife/splitter out of the saw and tap the moving pin with a hammer? Might loosen it up enough for you to remove. I have the 725t2 and it uses a different design, they may have seen that as a flaw and upgraded?
 

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this is what the riving knife look like with paws unmounted - the middle hole holds the shiny 'bolt' on the paws:
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this is the underside of the paw mounting device - push the big end of the shiny bit - small diameter appears - lifts out of hole. you may need some WD40/similar if it is 'stuck'
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you may be able to replace that "C" clip style pin with a more easily removable clevis pin.
 

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this is what the riving knife look like with paws unmounted - the middle hole holds the shiny 'bolt' on the paws:
Thanks Tom, you showed and described it clearly, I was too lazy to take photos of mine.

I forget which tool companies own which other companies, and sometimes different companies use the same suppliers. Dan has a Delta, my DeWalt jobsite saw has the same paw system.

you may be able to replace that "C" clip style pin with a more easily removable clevis pin.
Maybe, but once you know how it works it is easy enough.

I will have to try pushing in on that again, tomorrow . I tried earlier but my carpal tunnel has robbed me of most hand strength these days.
The shiny button just needs to be pushed flush to the surrounding black finish. Maybe try this: take a 2x2x3/4" piece of scrap, place the center of the face against the button, now you can use multiple fingers, or the heel of your hand etc to push on the wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All very good advice. You nailed it with the shiny button. Once you know what to do it was actually fairly easy to depress it to release the pawl (thanks for the spelling correction, George).

Bob, thanks for the advice to help compensate for the weakening hands. It really bothers me that I may reach a point physically that could hamper my retirement goal to make more sawdust. I used to be the go to guy to open the jar of pickles. I need to increase my creativity by using mechanical advantage, lubrication, and intelligence over brawn.

Thanks again for the help solving my problem.
 
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It really bothers me that I may reach a point physically that could hamper my retirement goal to make more sawdust.
I'm 63, have had hand joint pain and repetitive motion issues going back at least half of my life. I'm very lucky, most of the time it isn't bad enough to interfere with what I want to do. But it is enough to have a bit of understanding when someone else says they have hand trouble.

Yeah I can't grip a jar lid like I used to either. My trick for that is to lightly spit in my palms, then rub them until almost dry again, there is a magic amount of moister that grips the lid so well you hardly need any grip.

Dang it, another word I have to remember the spelling and context for. Humpf. Look at my avatar, I'll still call them paws. lol.
 
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