Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Further to my last thread- I've decided to butt the joints and glue and screw them. Not very elegant I know but less time-consuming than approx 3m worth of box joints. I don't have a workshop to commit to such a project!

However using plywood this leaves the problem of covering the exposed ends of the ply at each joint.

I wondered if it is possible to lift the top veneer of scrap ply to use as a thin covering on these occasions? I can leave a small lip at each joint to allow for a couple of mm's to house the ply strip.

I reckoned if I cut strips into the top veneer whilst it was stil attached to the scrap I could manufacture my own joint covering material. The only question is how to seperate the layers cleanly.

Is this something anyone else has tried?

Cheers


A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
now i may be wrong here, but would it be possible to make a make shift lap joint? on the piece that butts into the exsposed end could you cut out enough material untill theres just a thin layer of ply left to cover end
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Matt,

Looking locally it seems they only have the paper stuff-not the actual wood stuff you can stain etc. You're right - if I can find the right stuff that'd be the easiest solution...

Hi Smontanye,

That might just work--a couple of passes with the router should do it. I hadn't thought of that. Cheers

A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Your best bet would be to to glue solid wood edging onto the plywood. A sixteenth or eight-inch strip will serve alot better that the iron on tape. It looks alot better and will hold up to bumps better too. You'll have to allow for the thickness when you cut your plywood to size of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Spyko,

I actually went with the router idea---by and large it looks like it's going to work--the advantages being that if you want all one colour on the final finish you don't need to fiddle around for a colour-match with the wood, and of course there is no added expense---certainly the iron-on wood was going to add-on more cost to the project.

One panel suffered from the router being set just a fraction too deep and the lip is too fragile not to have got damaged already. But the rest -approx 2mm- is fine provided you handle it carefully. I'll post up pics when/if I can get the uploader to work!


Cheers


A
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top