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Hey guys, I just came across this link. I don't know if it has been posted before in here, but I own this jig and I think it is absolutely fantastic.

I have dealt with Kevin who is TexasTimbers and sells the jig and I think he is one of the nicest guys to deal with I have ever had the pleasure of meeting.

If you have questions about this jig, follow the link and it will answer them. I was lucky enough to buy this jig from the original maker and still have it. It will last a lifetime. I am glad to see Kevin keeping up the tradition of this jig.

Video Review of the Kehoe Jig by Charles Neil

Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well when I posted this, I had come straight from the link and posted my comments. After I was through, I then started scrolling and to my surprise, there is the same topic.

Sorry for posting something that was already here. Go ahead and delete it.

(TexesTimbers) Do I still get paid?
 

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Woodworks,
I am glad you posted this thread. I watched the video for the first time and had to order one from the Texas fellow. Looks like a lot of fun.
Mike Hawkins:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
GeorgeC,

That is a good question. I don't think the video comes with it. As far as getting it, I have no clue. Talk with TexasTimbers since he is the one who sells the jig. That might be something worth mentioning to him as I myself wouldn't mind having the video and I have had the jig for about 20 years.
 

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Hey Kevin!

IT WORKED!

I needed that refresher... I got the jig some time ago... Ended up in a drawer...

I'm going to take it OUT of the drawer and see if I can make a simple box to get my feet wet! Finally!

Thank you for the Link update... Makes a huge difference! :laughing:
 

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Hi Kevin,

I've watched that video several times to be sure it's soaking-in OK.

One thing I've noticed... His box (sides) are glued together before he cuts for the Kehoe splines... that is fine... BUT, the clamping action of the spline has been negated because there is nothing to really 'clamp' (the glued joint isn't going to 'give' any).

It seems to me, the best way, if one can do it, would be to clamp the box sides together, route for the splines, then glue-up the box and splines at the same time where the splines would negate the use of any other clamps in the glue-up.

Does that make sense to you... or am I just letting my mind wander too much?

If so, what kind of clamping jig would be able to be flexible enough to do it easily and reliably? Has someone already done it?

I guess all you'd need to do is hold only two pieces together at a time to make the cuts... not the whole box... that would be easier... duh?
... just make sure all parts are properly labeled, etc.

edit:
After a little more thought, I picture a jig where the box joints are at the end of the jig where a hole box could be straddled into place, for the rest of the joints... Much like a Shoemakers Jig where the complete shoe is put onto the jig.

What are your thoughts?

Thank you....
 

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Joe,
I think you're thinking too much.:laughing: I have the jig and think of it more of an adornment and a secondary means of securing the joint so it will never come apart. You could probably do it like you're thinking, but I think the end result will be about the same. Here's some pics of my cigar humidor I made with it. Canary wood with bloodwood splines.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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OK Mike... I was wondering about that... :laughing:

Thank you...

I see your splines were just about the last thing you did when constructing your humidor... NICE job!

I guess you just jury-rig some cradle to put the box in to get the corner to be cut to the top? Just stick it in a vise? ... or what?

The Finish you did sure made a huge difference in the looks! Beautiful!
... what did you use to Finish it?
 

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Sorry I missed this before - thanks Mike for the help.

Joe, I have used all the methods you mentioned and then some. I usually just glue the joint (whatever it may be) together and after it dries cut and install the splines. Remember most end grain glue joints are pretty much not going to stay together under any amoiunt of stress for very long, but once the splines are in and dry they won't come apart.

Z-lock miter joints etc. will stay glued together without splines when properly executed, except with some species (very oily/porous etc.) as long as the joints don't see much stress.

You can almost not go wrong with any approach you use as long as you follow the same procedures you would if you weren't going to install the splines. The splines add eye-appeal obviously, but they also make the joint virtually impossible to come apart when correctly installed.

Let me know if you need any help you can call me anytime - but in the meantime get your feet wet. ;)



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OK Mike... I was wondering about that... :laughing:

Thank you...

I guess you just jury-rig some cradle to put the box in to get the corner to be cut to the top? Just stick it in a vise? ... or what?
Joe, not sure what you are asking here. If you mean when you use the kehoe jig, if I remember right, I had the box sitting on its side with a clamp holding it to the workbench top.

The Finish you did sure made a huge difference in the looks! Beautiful!
... what did you use to Finish it?
For the finish, I started with a coat of shellac. Then about four coats of lacquer, sanding with 0000 steel wool in between coats. Part of the reason the wood looked so light in the unfinished pics is the sanding dust stuck to it. Canary wood is one of my favorites. It's hard to find it with the maroon streaks in it. When I see it at our local woodcraft, I buy it and save it for a special project like this one.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Anyone use it a router table?
I suppose one could, but why would you want to? One of the main advantages of the Kehoe is that you can use a handheld router and install the splines to any length workpiece, and so you are not confined to the router table.

A router table is handy in many situations, and even excels in many areas where a handheld router is inadequate, but this isn't one of them. Stick with the handheld router when using the Kehoe Joe and you'll be much better off. :yes:

For example, can you imagine sliding a 24" x 48" blanket chest across a router table? Not my cup of tea. :no:





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I would NOT think of putting a huge piece of furniture on the router table...

Maybe I should have said
"Has anyone used the Kehoe jig for small items like boxes, etc., that could EASILY be controlled, on the router table?"

I just put the jig on the router table, Flat side down, slid it around as if I was routing, and it really appeared that it could be EASILY done. Then I wondered if anyone else had tried it...

Any reasons to NOT try it? Anything to look out for?

Thank you...
 
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