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So I found a good deal (from my opinion) on a lathe today. Something to start out with anyways. It's a 12" Craftsman, with 6 tools, manual, drill chuck & stand. Not a scratch on it. Used only twice. Paid 75 bucks.

The tools are Marples......1/4 & 1/2" gouge, 1/2" diamond point chisel, 1/2" round nose chisel, 1/2" parting and 1/2" chisel.
I'm wondering if there are any other tools that I should be looking into to add to the collection to start out with.
Also some pointers on sharpening these. None have been used, except for the chisel. I have an electric wet wheel and an Arkansas flat stone.

The last time me and a lathe met was in grade 7 or 8 (30 something years ago :huh:). I do remember a few things, but would certainly welcome any pointers. The manual pretty much tells me a whole lot of nothing.

Rick
 

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Sounds like a good little deal to start with there.So I won't give my opinion on craftsman lathes :no: But anyway the question of what tools should I buy comes up quite a bit,But thats what folks are here for and thats to try an help.I would get on the lathe an do some turning for a bit and try different small projects to see what you may enjoy more than other things,example you may try spindles and not like it or you may go for bowls,platters,goblets an thing of that type.Then if an when you think HEY I like turnin bowls,then if you don't already have one,then look for a good bowl gouge.You don't want to just go out an spend 2 or 3 hundred bucks on tools,then find you don't like half of em.Good luck with your new toy an keep us updated as there are plenty of good folks out there that are more than willing to help.
 

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Webster,

I would recommend getting a grinder and the Wolverine sharpening system. This is the easiest to use and your tools definately have to be sharp. A sharper tool is so much easier to cut with. You could possibly use the wet wheel but I don't think it will be anywhere near as easy as a sharpening system

Now go out and find some free wood and start practicing. Be careful with the speed. Turn at the slowest speed that you find possible. I always thought faster was better but not always true. Especially when you are trying to learn the tools and how to use the bevel.

The link below will take you to an introduction to woodturning PDF file. I read it and it talks about a lot of great information.
http://www.turningtools.co.uk/pdf_files/pdfbook/introwt.pdf

Good luck!! It is fun and you can be very creative.
 

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It sounds like you have the basics for the tools. I would try to find someone in your area that would be willing to show you the right way to do things. It make learning to turn a lot easier. If that is not an option or if you are not comfortable doing that, then you are going to have to teach your self. Start with some scrap that you have laying around. You always want to start with the handle down so that the butt of the tool hits the piece first. Then raise the handle until it starts to cut. You will have to play with the angles you approach with to do curtain cuts. I agree with Woodsman, figure out what you want to really do first before you spend a bunch of money on more tools. A bowl gouge is a must if you want to turn bowls, it makes life a lot easier. Good luck and have fun.
 

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Just remembered,there are a lot of free videos on you tube on turning,Go an find the one by wood magazine turning on line.They have some nice videos on turning
Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sounds like a good little deal to start with there.So I won't give my opinion on craftsman lathes :no: But anyway the question of what tools should I buy comes up quite a bit,But thats what folks are here for and thats to try an help.I would get on the lathe an do some turning for a bit and try different small projects to see what you may enjoy more than other things,example you may try spindles and not like it or you may go for bowls,platters,goblets an thing of that type.Then if an when you think HEY I like turnin bowls,then if you don't already have one,then look for a good bowl gouge.You don't want to just go out an spend 2 or 3 hundred bucks on tools,then find you don't like half of em.Good luck with your new toy an keep us updated as there are plenty of good folks out there that are more than willing to help.
One thing I did find quite essential.......... a Face Sheild! :laughing: ouch!
Wearing glasses just doesn't quite cut it.

Everyones tips are greatly appreciated!
This site actualy gave me the inspiration to get into some turning. Seeing pictures of the projects works wonders (& seeing my never ending 'too good to toss' odds and ends)

Thanks Ken, just curious, what's your opinion on this lathe? Not that I'm trying to be cynical, but just wondering.
It's true about blowing a wad of dough on some tools, that get used, maybe once.......don't get me going on some of the router bits I have :huh:

PTownSubbie...that is a GREAT link for the book! Very informative & just what I need. The wolverine system seems a good way to go. I love using a sharp tool :thumbsup:, just hate sharpening them:thumbdown:

Thanks Termite....unfortunately, I don't have anyone in my area that turns, surprisingly, nor do I even know anyone that does! on the other hand I have no problem with teaching myself. I value every bit I learn.

Rick
 

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I am mostly self taught. I am fortunate though, I have an uncle that has been turning for years. He lives near Dallas though so we don't see him very often. We spent a week with him about a year and a half ago. I got to spend a lot of time with him out in the shop while we were there. He showed me a lot of the things I was doing wrong, and that really helped. I have really gotten into turning bowls. If you look at my photos there are a few in there.
 

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I am mostly self taught. I am fortunate though, I have an uncle that has been turning for years. He lives near Dallas though so we don't see him very often. We spent a week with him about a year and a half ago. I got to spend a lot of time with him out in the shop while we were there. He showed me a lot of the things I was doing wrong, and that really helped. I have really gotten into turning bowls. If you look at my photos there are a few in there.
Nice bowls Termite! Looks like you have something going on there that you really enjoy. How do you glue them up? Do you use just standard wood glue? I've wondered about that.....wondering if they could blow apart on me while turning.

It's nice to have someone take you under their wing like your Uncle, and show you the right and wrong way to do things. Some things you just never forget.
When I was quite little, my dad use to say to me 'come on, lets go build something in the basement' and I would sit on a stool for hours watching and not have a thing to say, but a few questions here and there. He passed away when I was 14. I still have many of his old tools, and not to mention....quite value them.

Better Homes & Gardens magazine comes to mind seeing those pictures of your shop. Nice, roomy, clean.....amazing!

Rick
 

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Thanks Webster, I got my passion for woodworking from my grandfather. I couldn't tell you the number of hours I spent with him out in the shop. He passed about 10 years ago, I was given a few of his tools after that. I charrish them very much. I am the only one of the grandchildren to carry on the passion for woodworking, so that gives me some benefits.

One nice thing I get my uncles hand me downs when he decides to upgrade his equipment. The only down side is the 1000 mile road trip to pick it up. Since my grandfather passed he is the one that has helped me out with advice and knowledge of woodworking. I can credit him for really getting me into turning. He challenges me to try new things and it is great.

As for the shop, I spent 4 months last summer building it. My old shop is ready to fall in on its self. It took me about a year to convince the wife to build it. I made it 10' longer than the old one. I made sure I had the electrical how I need it for all the tools I want in the future. It is not so clean at this point. I really need to get a DC. I have about 10 projects in various stages of completion, and messes all over the place. The new shop has been great though.
 

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webster,
I had an old Craftsman lathe with a round way that the tailstock slides on. Anyway I put a link belt on it and eliminated the vibration of the lathe. Before, when I ran the lathe at the lower speeds, the tools would vibrate off the table. The link belts help a lot.

Vince
 

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