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I recently made this from a rather rough block that I won in a raffle at the local club. Had to turn away quite a bit of wood to get rid of the cracks and rot, but it came out nice in the end.
Its a lovely wood to turn, nice long shavings and cuts nicely.
 

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Very pretty wood. I wish I could find some of that. If I am not mistaken that's a Hawaiian wood commonly used for musical instruments right? Nicely shaped platter.

Nope, I was thinking of Koa. Whatever it is it's prettty.

 

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Looks nice do you know the species
According to the title it is kauri which is mostly from either New Zealand or Australia. Downright pretty wood!
 

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Looks nice do you know the species
In the original post, he said it's kauri. Is there some reason you have for not believing this, or did you just miss that statement? I ask because I'm interested in knowing what different woods look like and karui is one I'm not personally familiar with.

If you were just looking for the botanical name and not actually questioning whether it's kauri, the genus is Agathis, species are numerous.

Paul
 

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phinds said:
In the original post, he said it's kauri. Is there some reason you have for not believing this, or did you just miss that statement? I ask because I'm interested in knowing what different woods look like and karui is one I'm not personally familiar with.

If you were just looking for the botanical name and not actually questioning whether it's kauri, the genus is Agathis, species are numerous.

Paul
Correct I was wondering if he new specifically the region because there are numerous species that fall under the kauri umbrella. This family of woods has always intrigued me because of it's age some as old as five thousand years old
 

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The species is Agathis australis. This pic is of a large one known as Tane Mahuta.
There's not many like this left now, most were milled for building houses and boats over 100 years ago. We use the bits that were left in the bush by the sawmillers, and pieces from buildings that get renovated or demolished. Sometimes big logs are found in swamps as well. These are often a darker colour.
 

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