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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this has been discussed here before. Does it bother anyone else that instructional videos show hand planes either being stored or just on the workbench sitting on their soles? One should always leave a plane on its' side when not being used. For me it really takes away from the videos' credibility. Ok, flame away. Thanks
 

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Two camps of thought on that issue - been argued before -

But just for the H--- of it I'll be devil's advocate.

If it is a wooden workbench what is it going to hurt? Unless you have one of those pristine workbenches that a scratch would bother you - in which case why are you working on it anyway?

If you lay a plane on the side two possible things can happen - 1. The blade is exposed and if you reach for something, the possibility of a cutting yourself is much higher. 2. The blade is exposed and the possibility of nicking the blade with another tool while it is laying on its' side goes from zero to a much higher number.
 

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Don't forget that a plane on its side is easier to knock off the bench. If it's on its sole the blade can grab and prevent it.

If you can't tell, I'm a sole sitter ;-0
 

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Mine sit on their soles while I'm using them on the bench, while they're in storage on the shelf under my bench, or if they're on felt/mats in the drawers for the specialty planes.

If the yellow pine bench is going to dull them I'm not sure what hope they had on the cherry, white oak or walnut...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What about

a stray wood screw laying on the bench? Or a drill bit, etc. Don't forget vibrating machine tools rattling the bench or cabinet. Think an air compressor or sanders. Just my thought.
If I have to worry about slicing my hand from a hand plane on its' side on the work bench it would seem the proper thing to do would be move it.
 

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Old school here. Shop class back in 19 aught 60.....you left the plane on its side when you weren't using it and retracted the blade when done before putting it back in the till. Still do it.
 

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Sorry if this has been discussed here before. Does it bother anyone else that instructional videos show hand planes either being stored or just on the workbench sitting on their soles? One should always leave a plane on its' side when not being used. For me it really takes away from the videos' credibility. Ok, flame away. Thanks
It no more worries me than any other tool put down safely on a workbench .
On your bench , sit the toe of the plane on something if it worries you .
For storage , build a shelf with a wee batten running it's length.
 

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Laying on the side was ingrained in me, too. It's a long time habit that I'm not breaking. Of course, my edge is so sharp, just the weight of the plane would force it to cut through the bench by separating the atoms and land on the floor. I'm not like Roy Underhill with tools and stuff all over the bench. There's no way any of my sharpened edges would contact any other tool or metal. Same with my kitchen knives. They never go in the dishwasher or get placed in a drawer with other utensils. I'm even fussier when it comes to handsaws.
 

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Side layer here...probably goes back to 7th grade for me, too, back in 'ought 70.

I've been watching for a great deal on a hand plane for a little while, stumbled on a lower quality one at the back of my workbench last week. I absent mindedly took it into the kitchen when I went to get something to drink and had to put it down (on my cherry countertop). When I picked it back up, I realized I'd automatically put it on its side...muscle memory? I haven't decided if I'll sharpen this one or not...

It was on its sole when I found it on the bench, so go figure!
 

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Always a side layer. Second thing we were taught in 7th grade. Right after "nails only hold themselves".

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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I generally lay mine on their sides. That said, it's likely that my next bench will have a tool well, and I'm planning to put a small strip front to back that I can rest the front of the planes on so I can set them handle-up. That'll keep the edge away from the bench, and also make them that much easier to pick up. Or I'll just set them in with the toe in the well and the rest angled up to the work surface.
 

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I don't like putting mine down on their sides because I find they are more likely to fall over that way. I have a little holder I sit mine in that leaves space for the blade if it isn't retracted.
 

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I have lots of 2x2x1/4 pieces I use on my clamp faces when gluing. I keep one or two on my bench all the time and just sit the front tip of the plane on one of the 2x2s. This keeps the edge nice and safe and still allows the plane to sit on its sole - sort of. Absent a 2x2, I'll set the plane on its side.

Kevin H.
 

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a stray wood screw laying on the bench? Or a drill bit, etc. Don't forget vibrating machine tools rattling the bench or cabinet. Think an air compressor or sanders. Just my thought.
If I have to worry about slicing my hand from a hand plane on its' side on the work bench it would seem the proper thing to do would be move it.
That's not an issue with my workflow, but things to keep in mind if they affect yours. I'm wasn't trying to be contrarian but just trying to point out why it doesn't mean that they don't know what they're talking about.

If I kept drill bits loose anywhere, but especially my planing bench, they would be thrown away the first time I cleaned up. I keep them in their index box. Screws stay in their box or a hinged clasping plastic box for hardware 'in use'. Sanding happens only after planing, so they're put away... certainly my compressor stays on the floor.
 

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I have lots of 2x2x1/4 pieces I use on my clamp faces when gluing. I keep one or two on my bench all the time and just sit the front tip of the plane on one of the 2x2s. This keeps the edge nice and safe and still allows the plane to sit on its sole - sort of. Absent a 2x2, I'll set the plane on its side.

Kevin H.
Kevin, I use little scraps of 2x pieces when clamping too ... do you actually attach them to your clamps, and if so, how?
 

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Kevin, I use little scraps of 2x pieces when clamping too ... do you actually attach them to your clamps, and if so, how?
I have some small scraps of hard maple I use as clamping blocks.

I drilled a shallow e.g., 1/4in deep hole with a Forstner bit to fit my Bessey F clamps which have the widest round jaws. In the middle of the hole I drilled a small hole for a rare earth magnet to be inserted flush with the bottom of the Forstner hole. This allows the clamping block to be held by the clamp is I need one handed operation.
 

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Wood Snob
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amckenzie4 said:
I generally lay mine on their sides. That said, it's likely that my next bench will have a tool well, and I'm planning to put a small strip front to back that I can rest the front of the planes on so I can set them handle-up. That'll keep the edge away from the bench, and also make them that much easier to pick up. Or I'll just set them in with the toe in the well and the rest angled up to the work surface.
You won't regret the tool tray. Great place to set tools you are using as you rotate material.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 
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