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Discussion Starter #1
While looking for lost tools I found another Disston hand saw. It’s pretty rusty because it’s been in an outside storage shed for years and I’m just now cleaning it up. I can’t read the Etching yet, but I can see that it’s there and it doesn’t appear to have any deep scratches.

I tried to measure the teeth and I don’t know if it’s a 8 or a 9 tooth per inch. if I count the 1st tooth and the last tooth on the inch, I have 9.

The funny thing is that I just bought a Disston 8tpi saw on eBay so that I would have a set and now I find this one. I knew I had more saws, but didn’t know how many. I did give some away to my daughter and to my son. Neither my son nor my daughter has any respect for tools and the saw are probably laying out in the yard in the dirt. I myself did not know much about old saws and just assumed that they were worthless until recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't remember if this was posted in an earlier thread when you were talking about Disston saws, but you can date your saw by the medallion design. Can also determine model of the saw by the handle design.

http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/index.html
Thanks! I think I did see that, just not from that page. I have it soaking a little in wd40 before washing it and removing the rust with Evapo-Rust. Then I should be able to read the etching
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well it turns out to be a Disston D-23 post-1928 & pre 1940s. Still have more work to do on it, but it looks pretty good.
 

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Cool! Lets see some pics! I love old saws and the rehab process. I just love sawing with handsaws!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was wrong about it being pre 1940s I thought the median was brass, but after cleaning it up a little I realized it was nickel.
According to the Disstonian Institute Medallions Page, it is a 1947-53, 13/16" medallion.

I think it was closer to 1947 because the handle is Apple or so it appears. Now I could be wrong, but I don’t believe it is beech which was after 1947 or so according to the Disstonian Institute D23 page. Although looking at it in the Photo it appears much lighter so I just don't know.

The description taken from Disston 1947-50 catalogs listed it as a D-23 Lightweight Pattern Straight-back. Crosscut: 26" length, 9 ppi with a Disston steel blade, high polish, striped back, true taper ground. Cover-top, carved handle, weather-proof finish.

This all is in line with the history of my Dad who joined the Carpenters Union just out of WWII and bought most of his hand tools at that time. I inherited most of his woodworking hand tools in ’77 only I had no idea of the value or what was to come.

I still have to clean it some more with some fresh Evapo-Rust and steel wool. I was at Home Depot last night and forgot to pick up more steel wool.

So this is what I have so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Need help on final cleaning

I was about to redo the Evapo Rust soak again, but there is no more rust only the black carbon residue. I've been searching for methods to clean that up and all I can find is "wash it with water".:huh:

Well its not washing off with water, but if I rub it long enough, I can see that black is on my rag. There has to be a better way to do this without sand paper and I was wondering if maybe I should use rubbing compound or something.

I don't want to damage the etching.
 

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I don't use Evapo Rust so I don't know for sure, but you might try using scotch brite pads and some mineral spirits, or just your rag with some mineral spirits.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just got back from Wal-Mart and saw some chrome rust remover and cleaner so I bought it. I'll give it a try and see how it works.
 

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I have not used evaporust on saws. I have used it on other tools and used steel wool to remove the black layer. On saws I use wd-40 and sandpaper. It takes some work but you end up with a nice slick finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well I just tried the steel wool and it just wasn't doing anything. I then tried the Chrome polish on the side with the etching and I was surprised at the results although it takes a lot of elbow grease and lots of paper towels. I may start using this stuff for regular maintenance and I wish I would have started using it 30 years ago.

On the other side, I started it with the polish but it was a little more work because it was pitted so I used wet/dry sandpaper with WD40 and it was cleaning up pretty good. I didn't finish because I need more sandpaper.

I may even try power buffing the side with the etching to see if I can read the etching better.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, I just can't get it any better without ruining the etching, so I'm calling it done.

 
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