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I agree with that. They should send it out and sell it refurbished. Even harbor freight does it. Grizzly has a scratch and dent section. You know what else bothers me about them, they dont give us Veterans our 10% discount anymore. Ugggh! Lowes does it, but home depot stopped. When I ask why, they say they dont know. I am switching to lowes because I need the discount. :thumbsup:
Lowes gives a 10% discount to Vets???????? how do we go about getting this discount?????
 

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Manufacture of goods has become such an exact science now that the demise of your favourite tool is now timed almost to the minute. Not only is it impossible to get it repaired, they just don't import parts. Transportation and handling is just too expensive. What I find maddening is Makita has parts available for all kinds of old products but goods made in North America have no parts available.

I have a Ridgid table saw guaranteed for life. I'm interested in seeing what will happen when I have a warranty claim.

Another thing I find difficult to accept is that manufacture is moved out of Canada into the Pacific Rim when it is far less expensive to produce goods here than it is to produce it in China and India. Shareholders benefit little because markup shrinks along with their dividends, employees lose their jobs, the raw material supply chain shrinks and on and on and on. The only people that benefit are the corporate executives who gain huge bonuses for increasing market share at everyone else's expense.

Allthunbs
 

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I worked for a DeWalt service center once and innocently asked one time if something that they were going to throw away could be had by me. That was a big No No for sure. When they throw things away they smash them and them put a lock on the dumpster.
 

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In high school, 20 years back, I worked at Sears. At one point I was assigned to the hardware department's stockroom. When 'defective' power tools were returned it was my job to render them inoperable by whatever means I deemed fit before chucking them in the bin. Mostly, I would bash the hell out of them with the gold-painted, long-handeled sledgehammer we had dubbed 'Crusher'. Looking back, if I had wanted to seek out a business arrangement with area woodworkers, I suppose I could have arranged to throw the tools away, undamaged, at a pre-determined hour in marked boxes. At the time, however, I rather enjoyed getting payed to smash expensive machinery.
The policy that DID strike me as was the destruction of returned workboots before tossing them in the trash. The dumpster-diving hoboes must have been disgusted by such wanton wastefulness.
I currently work at sears in the appliance department. I just had the opportunity last week to take a big sledge hammer to some appliances that wouldn't sell. They had marked the prices down, but not enough where someone would want to buy a used or damaged floor model. First, everything was spray painted with a big black "X" on it, and then the fun came with the sledge hammer. I added up the retail value of all the items and it came to a stagering $15,000 All of the junk items were then taken to the landfill. It doesn't really make sense why they wouldn't lower the price to even get $100 for an item. That would seem like the more logical thing to do than junk the stuff.
 

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I worked for Sears 20-30 years ago. They trashed lots of tools, clothes, you name it because with "satisfaction garranteed or your money back", you could return anything and get a refund.

If you bought a damaged tool for 1/2 price at one store, you could return it at another store for full price. Sounds unlikley, but things like that happened all the time.

People would come in with lifetime tools that they picked up at garage sales and get new/full price refunds. From time to time Sears has a set of pliers, sockets, wrenches or whatever in a set at a very good price. Don't know about now, but those specials were called "class one" sale items. So some people would buy the set, then return each piece one at a time for full price.

Used to really PMO (make me mad) when the sales person told the "customer" no, then the customer wants to see "your boss" So I'd tell them no, get your boss, he'd tell then no, and so on up the line all the way to the store manager, who always said "Write the refund".

Left Sears 20+ years ago and thinking about these "war stories" still gets me worked up.

OK, back to the present. I'm not defending stores policy, or maybe I am, I don't know. Just a fact of life that a few dead beats can screw things up for the the rest of us.
 

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Knucklebustger, I can understand what you are saying.

I have been in Sears stores and have seen people return what are obviously mistreated tools. These cheats are doing harm to all of us. Their cheating raises the cost of tools for all of us. I wish that just once I had of heard a clerk say they could not accept the return.

George
 

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It doesn't really make sense why they wouldn't lower the price to even get $100 for an item. That would seem like the more logical thing to do than junk the stuff.
I think the answer to this question is pretty simple. If Sears or any other dealer of goods would take this policy up - the sales on regular items would go down - people would just wait for the opportunity for items of this nature to come up for sale. The whole out look for retail business is to make "money". I am sure when something is destroyed - it goes on the "lost" column" for a tax deduction. Many years ago - I had the pleasure of destroying hundreds of thousand of dollars worth of government property. Talk about waste - but then again - if they had given it away or donated it - who would of received the property - and who would of complain about not getting anything or not enough ?
 

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This started as a thread about HD?
Well, let me tell you something. The HD here is located
in a high end part of town, actually they share the park-
ing lot with a high end restaurant.
And their prices reflect their location. As well as the class
of things they carry.

They only have the upper grades of everything. They have
almost no lumber, but every high end toilet seat they
make and $1000 faucets for the kitchen sink. It is
pointless for the average person to go in the place.

Lowes always has a table or two of returned or display
stuff, and most of the time it is a real bargain. I got a
B&D palm sander for $10 and a tradesman 3 1/2"
Hand power planer for $15. I also buy laminate floor-
ing off the bargain table for table tops and desk tops.

Lowes here shares the parking lot with McD's!:laughing::laughing::laughing:
 
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