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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

this is a repost from the General Forum (I think I should have posted it here in the first place - apologies)

I just bought the Craftsman Professional 6 1/8 1hp jointer at an auction. When I got it home I realized it was wired for 240v (the plug gave it away). I need to get it back to 120 and there are no wiring diagrams on the motor. Can anyone help me make sense of many wires coming out of the motor housing? I tried to call Craftsman and after spending 45 minutes on the phone to various Sears/Craftsman call centers all over the world I finally got a very poor response: they told me to go to one of their repair centers and try and talk to a repair technician...and no, I couldn't call them directly. Very frustrating. All I need is the wiring diagram for this motor.

can anyone out there help me?

Many thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your help bigredC. (your name reminds me of a fantastic band called "Great Big Sea")

The insulated plug wire goes to the switch (I'm assuming it's a standard 14/2 with a white, black and ground but I can't see it). From the switch comes a black, white and ground. The ground is fixed to the body of the jointer. The white wire is connected to a black wire marked #1. The black wire is connected to two wires: a black one (marked #4) and a white one (marked #8). These three wires go into the motor.

With me? Now it starts to get interesting.

Three more wires come from the motor that are connected to each other: two black (marked #2 and #3) and a white wire (marked #5).

All number markings are on white tape.

If I haven't left you completely befuddled you may be asking yourself "Where are the wires #6 and #7?" and I would think that is a very good question as there is no evidence of any wires other than the ones I have mentioned.

Does this make any sense to you? I have a pretty good understanding of the difference between 240 and 120 (essentially, no neutral wire), but this plate of spaghetti has left me flummoxed.

Gratefully,
Brad
 

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Today is your lucky day. I'm an electrician
disguised as woodworker, and your motor has stander generic wiring. Take apart the (2,3,5), and rearrange the wires. Just connect one feed wire coming from the plug white or black to (4,5,2) and the other feed wire to (3,8,1). This is a standard 120 motor wiring. Here comes the good part. If the motor spins the wrong way interchange the 5 and 8 and it will spin the other direction. Get a new plug for the end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for this great advice! I'll give it a try tomorrow and let you know how it goes.

I do have a question though. I'm assuming that as #5 and #8 are responsible for the direction of the motor, they directly correlate to the "hot" and "neutral" (black and white) from the wall. So, if that's the case, which number should (theoretically) connect to the neutral?

thanks again!

Brad
 

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I edited the words hot and changed it to feed wires. Leave the 5 and 8 in the groups I showed them, and just add one feed wire to each group. If turns the wrong way you will change the grouping from (4,5,2) / (3,8,1) to (4,8,2) / (3,5,1) The motor doesn't know the difference between hot and neutral it just takes the combined voltage. Is there little wire nuts inside or what how are the sets of wires connected to each other. They use different methods. If you are still confused e mail me at [email protected] and I will give you my phone # . It's easier to say it, than type it. There is a (6&7) in a 3 phase motor.
 

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When I was 20 and first became an electrician. I worked for a very strait lased Christian guy. It always made me chuckle when we talked about motors, because the thing that sticks off the side of the motor with wires in it, is called a pecker head. :laughing:
 

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Hello all,

this is a repost from the General Forum (I think I should have posted it here in the first place - apologies)

I just bought the Craftsman Professional 6 1/8 1hp jointer at an auction. When I got it home I realized it was wired for 240v (the plug gave it away). I need to get it back to 120 and there are no wiring diagrams on the motor. Can anyone help me make sense of many wires coming out of the motor housing? I tried to call Craftsman and after spending 45 minutes on the phone to various Sears/Craftsman call centers all over the world I finally got a very poor response: they told me to go to one of their repair centers and try and talk to a repair technician...and no, I couldn't call them directly. Very frustrating. All I need is the wiring diagram for this motor.

can anyone out there help me?

Many thanks
If the diagrams posted here by some of the electrical people do not work out you might give Sears another call and have them send you the owner's manual. Those usually have wiring conversion diagrams in them. The manual may actually be available on line from Sears as a PDF file.

Howard Ferstler
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Howard, but Sears was completely useless and I will never venture into their customer support network ever again. If I didn't consider my time so important, what I went through would have been comical. Honestly, it was unbelievable how many wrong departments and "please hold...your call may be monitored blah blah blah..." non-conversations I had. After the computer I was listening too "couldn't complete my call" and hung up on me (after being transfered three times), I tried one more time and finally got through to a person who could address my concerns and she told me that she couldn't help me and she couldn't give me a phone number of someone who could, and there was no one else I could speak to, but that I could try driving to one of their repair centres to speak with a technician (no I couldn't have their phone number) but there was no guarantee they could help.

Ugh.

Also, I have the manual and there is no wiring diagram.

BigredC has been very helpful and I can't express how grateful I am for his knowledgeable help. His explanations are clear and his offer to call him directly very generous. I haven't done the re-wiring yet as today was our annual "Christmas Tree Day" where we go out and slaughter our tree and have an evening with friends and family.

I'm enjoying this bulletin board and am impressed with the knowledge and wit that is shared here.

BigredC: I don't think I'll need to call you but thank you.

I'm re-wiring the jointer tomorrow and starting on a pile of hard maple for a lovely harvest table I promised my wife.

Thanks to all,
Brad
 

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Your right about all the help. I'm glad I was
finally able to give back. I'm new to woodworking, I've been able to get all my questions answered. And some I didn't even know I was supposed to ask. It's eliminated almost all the frustration involved in learning something new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
OK, just wired it up and it seemed to run a bit slow...and the wrong direction. Switched 8 and 5, and presto - correct direction but again it seemed a bit slow...and then it blew the breaker. The plate says it's a 12.5 amp motor and it's on a 15 amp breaker with nothing else drawing power. I tried a different outlet (on a different breaker) and it blew that one too. (So it's not a weak breaker)

When I pull on the belt it moves the blades easily

The outlet is 30 feet from the panel and I used a 15 foot extension cord - could that be the difference?

Could the last owner have put in a stronger motor? (there's no plate on the motor stating what it is - the plate I'm reading is on the jointer stand)

Is there something I need to do in the switch?

If one of the wires isn't connected properly (i.e. it slipped out of the nut) would that cause the breaker to go?

Finally, do I need to run 240 into my shop? I've been wanting to do that for a while anyway...the table saw would certainly enjoy running on 240...I just don't have the money right now and I would like to use my jointer...

Many thanks,
Brad
 

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If you are putting it on a 15 amp breaker and there is anything else on it at the same time it will trip. It should be on it own dedicated 20 amp breaker. Depending how handy you are, if it was me I would bring it over to the panel, Turn the main off tie it directly onto a 20 amp breaker. Turn it on and see how it runs. If it runs the same, then put it back to 220 and tie it onto a 2 pole breaker like the one for your dryer. If you can't get close to the panel you could go to Home Depot and buy 50' of 12/2 or a 50' good extension cord and cut the ends off. Then tie it onto the breaker. If it came wired from the factory at 220 and the plate says 12.5 amps at 220. It's going to draw twice that at 110. Your looking at 25 amps. There isn't going to be any receptacles in your house that will hold that. It would have to be on a 30 amp breaker. Can you take a picture of the plate and post it? Normally the plate for the motor will be marked 110/220 the under that will have amps 25/12.5. They would line up. 15' isn't far enough to have voltage drop. You do want to use a good extension cord. It should be #12 wire. Most cords are 14 some cheap ones are 16. That could cause problems. I had to work a friends car at the bottom of the drive so I brought my 110 compressor down and ran a 100' 14 gauge cord. It wouldn't run and it tripped the breaker. That was much farther. A loose connection could also give you the problem but usually it will stop and start not run slower. The switch is different, It's a 2 pole switch, meaning it cuts the power to both wires. For 110 you only need to switch one wire. That won't hurt anything. If you are only 30' from the panel you could just run the wire yourself. Elec. work is a lot of common sense. If you are mechanically inclined I could tell you what to do.
 

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You could also just put it back to 220 use the extension cord like I wrote and use it that way until you are able to get it done right. When you are working in the panel you should turn off the main and use a flashlight. Don't do it with the power on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks bigredc,

The plate definitely says 12.5 amps at 110. It's stamped right below the Craftsman logo. As the owners manual informs me, that's how it comes from the factory. I have 2 dedicated 15 amp circuits going into my garage so I'm positive there is nothing else drawing any power. My extension cords are all 12/2 (the big orange ones).

I'm pretty good with electrics. I had to rewire my second floor when we moved in three years ago (when we bought the place, I missed a deceptive reno where romex from the panel led to a hidden junction that fed the knob and tube. I spent many hours sweating in the attic fixing that issue). I can wire a three way switch and I understand the relationship between volts and amps.

I've been wanting to run a 60amp pony panel out to the garage but the cost is prohibitive right now. I figure the whole thing will cost about $400 in materials (that 6/3 wire ain't cheap)...and it is Christmas...and my wifes birthday is the 24th...and my twin children's is the 21st....generally I declare bankruptcy in January.

I paid $125 for this jointer at an auction. I'm hoping the motor is not shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Also, FYI, my table saw draws 13 amps from the same receptacle with no problems. I really think the issue with the jointer. What would cause it to bog down and draw so much power?
 

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Hi bigredc
Thank you for the concise wiring drawings. I have a big old belt/disc sander which has a 120/240 volt motor, but has a capacitor start. The capacitor is adrift in the base of the motor unit, and wiring is partially unhooked. Can you show me how the capacitor should be wired into the circuit for 120 volt operation, and how it should be wired in for 240 volt? Also, how can I test the capacitor to see if it is still functional. I bought this equipment used and cheap, and the original owner was running it with a belt drive to a smaller motor, so I need to wire it up to see if the original motor is working, or needs to be replaced.

Thank you very much for any help you can give me.

Gerry
 

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I'll look thru my books and get back to you. You got me thinking that might be Brad's problem. Bradley if you read this. The motor you changed to 110 might need a capacitor to give it a jolt to get it going. The more I think about it I'm sure it does. All my 110 motors have a capacitor.Ten years ago I would have thought of that right away when I was doing a lot of industrial elec. All I've been doing the last 10 years is new comercial construction. I'll get my nose in the books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
thanks,

I've been doing some research and found references to a centrifugal switch that operates the capacitor. From what I've read, I should hear a "click" when the capacitor switches off when the motor is coming up to speed (and, conversely, when the motor is slowing down)...or something like that...I don't know...I don't hear any click.

I have a neighbour who is an electrician doing commercial construction and his only help was to come over and tell me there was no wiring diagram and that I should leave it at 220 anyway because it would be cheaper on my hydro bill (I'm not convinced of this as, from my reckoning, double the volts and half the amps still consumes the same amount of watts, and I pay per Kilowatt hour.) I feel like he was like the thing that sticks off the side of the motor with all the wires in it...:smile:

I'm at the point now where I want to bring 240 out to the garage and rewire my table saw (which a feel very confident doing thanks to your diagrams bigredc).
 

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The thing that clicks on and off is a centrifugal switch that cuts the start winding in and out at an rpm that the engineer spec'd. The start winding is only in the circuit to help get the motor started. It sounds like you have a motor problem since the PO was having one also, he was running it off another motor.

Tom
 
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