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Hey all. This is my second post - and in my first post - I realized with the help of forum members, I may need a planer. Now that I've read other posts and internet vids, maybe I need a jointer.. Just want to make sure that what I understand is right... so here goes.

I know a jointer makes the planes of the board true by cutting off material on the in feed and supporting the material on the outfeed.. usually they are six inch blades. they can also fix bows, etc..

I know that a planer will take a prescribed amount of wood off of a board face, usually up to 13 inches wide for table mounted planers.. can fix crooked boards with a sled... etc.

Here's me: After 3 years of developing my WW hobby, buying some stuff, trying some stuff out, I just sold my first table and bench set. pretty awesome. but my biggest concern in my first post was that I was spending about 50% of my time sanding to get rid of the imperfections in the wood I am buying. Forum members suggested a planer (and other stuff) to get that stop layer off and get to a smooth surface. The largest size piece of wood my table and bench sets have is the 2x10x8'. And the benches 2x6x8'. Because of these sizes I am thinking that a planer is the way to go because of the board widths. And again my goal is to get rid of the top 1/16-1/8 layer of pits, scratches, etc. (I can't afford to buy higher quality/prepped wood right now).

However as I learn more about jointers - it seems it might be useful for the tops of the table as they are 4 2x10x8' pieces and would be great to sit exactly against each other. What I've done this far is just sand sand sand. and it takes hours. But as jointers have 6" blades, how do you flatten a 10" wide board? i'm not sure I know enough.

And I know that the best option is to have both a planer and a sander and that will solve all of my problems. But where I am at now, I have to sell another table set to buy only one (planer or jointer). When I sell a second, maybe I can buy another. I have 5 table sets (with lots of sanding :)) ready to go. So on my next sell, I will buy one or the other.

Really looking for some advice on which one and why. Thank you for reading this long ass post. and thanks for your advice. As I progress I hope to contribute more to the forum.

p.s. As I've been looking at planers. I have found that the DeWalts seem pretty good as long as you get aftermarket knives. any other brands/ideas for a planer.

As for jointers - I have no idea. I see a lot of "vintage" older style craftsmans for an affordable price. but if this is the way to go- would need some direction as to what I'm looking for.

Price range for either - 300-500?

Thanks
J
 

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Wow look at you jumping right in, I like that. Good on you for learning about this stuff. There's a ton of information out there, you just have to go find it.
You could joint an edge on a table saw or a router if need be, there are some threads out there that talk about how to do that, build the jigs and all.
As far a bench top planer goes, a 2x10x8 won't kill it, but run a bunch of them through and it will most certainly put a hurtin on it.
Instead of 2x10's what about using 2x6"s, that way you could use a 6" jointer. Just a thought.
 

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Both machines are good to have but if it comes down to either or I would go with a jointer. I worked for many years before I bought a planer but I've had a jointer from day one. Most of the time you work with lumber already surfaced but the jointer is needed to straighten the wood especially for glue up panels.
 

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The "typical" way many woodworkers square up lumber is to:

1. Use the jointer to joint one face flat.
2. Place that now flattened face against the fence of the jointer and joint one edge. This ensures the edge is true and square to the first face.
3. The board is run through the planer to get the 2nd face flat and parallel to the first face.
4. Finally, the table saw is used to get the 2nd edge parallel to the first.

With this method, you are always using a flat surface to register all the other surfaces against to ensure your lumber is flat and all the faces are square to one another.

Of course, many people use other methods and have been getting by for years without having these three tools.
 

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Both machines are good to have but if it comes down to either or I would go with a jointer. I worked for many years before I bought a planer but I've had a jointer from day one. Most of the time you work with lumber already surfaced but the jointer is needed to straighten the wood especially for glue up panels.
Agree completely. I was in wood working for 20 years before buying a planer. Still do not use it very much.

If you purchase rough sawn wood then you need a planer. You may save money buying the rough wood, but then you have to figure in the price of the planer.

George
 

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Hey all. This is my second post - and in my first post - I realized with the help of forum members, I may need a planer. Now that I've read other posts and internet vids, maybe I need a jointer.. Just want to make sure that what I understand is right... so here goes.

I know a jointer makes the planes of the board true by cutting off material on the in feed and supporting the material on the outfeed.. usually they are six inch blades. they can also fix bows, etc..

I know that a planer will take a prescribed amount of wood off of a board face, usually up to 13 inches wide for table mounted planers.. can fix crooked boards with a sled... etc.

Here's me: After 3 years of developing my WW hobby, buying some stuff, trying some stuff out, I just sold my first table and bench set. pretty awesome. but my biggest concern in my first post was that I was spending about 50% of my time sanding to get rid of the imperfections in the wood I am buying. Forum members suggested a planer (and other stuff) to get that stop layer off and get to a smooth surface. The largest size piece of wood my table and bench sets have is the 2x10x8'. And the benches 2x6x8'. Because of these sizes I am thinking that a planer is the way to go because of the board widths. And again my goal is to get rid of the top 1/16-1/8 layer of pits, scratches, etc. (I can't afford to buy higher quality/prepped wood right now).

However as I learn more about jointers - it seems it might be useful for the tops of the table as they are 4 2x10x8' pieces and would be great to sit exactly against each other. What I've done this far is just sand sand sand. and it takes hours. But as jointers have 6" blades, how do you flatten a 10" wide board? i'm not sure I know enough.

And I know that the best option is to have both a planer and a sander and that will solve all of my problems. But where I am at now, I have to sell another table set to buy only one (planer or jointer). When I sell a second, maybe I can buy another. I have 5 table sets (with lots of sanding :)) ready to go. So on my next sell, I will buy one or the other.

Really looking for some advice on which one and why. Thank you for reading this long ass post. and thanks for your advice. As I progress I hope to contribute more to the forum.

p.s. As I've been looking at planers. I have found that the DeWalts seem pretty good as long as you get aftermarket knives. any other brands/ideas for a planer.

As for jointers - I have no idea. I see a lot of "vintage" older style craftsmans for an affordable price. but if this is the way to go- would need some direction as to what I'm looking for.

Price range for either - 300-500?

Thanks
J
i didn't read any other post's yet, but you should get both, jointer for the edges, and a planer for the wide board's , of course the smaller one's also, saves time and get them right, i have been wood working probly 50 or so yrs and never been out of eather one, and a table saw is also a must too. i have the ridgid they are low end tool's and do a very good job and lifetime warrenty, if the warrenty papers are sent in, and not just regestered on line, the planer has doubble edge blades (2) and they used to include a extra set, don't know if they still do , the planer is very good also , you just have to set ut the 90 degree's and 45 degree, and than all is fine, mine out of the box has work with out any down time, the same with the planer, check the HD for prices, i have had mine for i know 10 yrs? for got when i got them, could look it up , but not important good luck
 

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For 8' long boards, you would need an expensive long bed jointer. If you are mainly cleaning off the faces of these boards, you definitely want a planer. They have feed rollers to send the board through. A jointer does not have these, unless you buy a separate feeder and attach it. Also, if you ever try pushing a board over a jointer by hand on its face, it is like holding onto a mad tiger for a few minutes. I doubt if you will want to repeat the experience very often.

Get the planer and buy a router with a straight flute bit to put the smooth edge on your boards. You can clamp a straight edge on the face of the board and move the router along that to obtain the straight, smooth edge. Then, you can use the router for many other applications, too.
 

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I bought a planer, used on Craigslist. I still don't have a jointer as I've found careful prep on my tablesaw makes cuts good enough for joining without a jointer. Especially if I use a good quality, fresh blade.

Jointing can also be done more cheaply (if budget is a concern) with a router. It's not fun, it's not easy, but it's cheaper than buying a jointer and faster than sanding.

And, of course, there's the old-fashioned way. Get a hand jointer and go to town like your great great grandparents did. It builds character... (of course I've never done this, so how would I know, right?)

That said, if it's in your budget, having both a jointer and a planer is the way to go.
 

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I'm not sure how you would joint with a hand held router. But with the router on a table, and a split fence, it's a breeze.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks all for your input I greatly appreciate it. It seems the overall message is "it's best to have both." But I do have concerns about the lengths and widths of boards I am using and doing that on a jointer. I think I will focus my efforts firstly on getting a planer. Now a few questions.
with 10" wide boards and 8' long boards - can I do that on a bench mount planer? Do I need to make a special stand or find some rollers? What are some creative ways you have managed? Also, I've read a lot of neg. reviews about the DeWalts and their dull blades. and have read a lot of positive reviews about the rigid. But the rigid is like half as expensive? any knowledge would be appreciated.
Also, should I forget the bench top and try to find something on CL that is stationary with a bigger motor but most likely will be an old model? And if so, what should I look for and look out for? I see some old style stuff - but I'm not sure what the pitfalls are on these. I can manage the space for another stationary machine.
Lastly, should I purchase a jig for sharpening the blades and do it myself (this would be best)? do the jigs out there work effectively in your experience? does one stand out?

thanks again all for your continued input in my efforts to build my shop.

J
 

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I bought a jointer a while back, I use it mainly to joint edges mainly, rarely to flatten a board.

Maybe I'm nut but... once I have a good edge ready for a glue up, I cut channels in the edges to allow for a spline. If the material is bowed (in some lengths, its pretty much a guarantee), I find that I can knock the majority of it out with the splines.

I recently picked up a 13" dewalt planer and it has been really useful for the cutting boards I've been making. What an amazing time and energy saver.

I might have some 65" + glue ups to so soon and look forward to using the planer on the project.
 

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I'm not sure how you would joint with a hand held router. But with the router on a table, and a split fence, it's a breeze.
Simply run the router along a straight edge clamped to the board. Even though I have a jointer, for really big workpieces that are difficult to control on the jointer I still use this method. I have a 12' aluminium straight edge for the purpose.
 

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When planing boards 8' long or longer, it it is worth it to build infeed and outfeed tables. These can be rollers, also, but you could use some of your 8' lumber and make the tables for no added expense. I like to put a little incline on the far ends of the tables so the far end of the board is lifted a little as it is fed into the planer or as it comes out the back side. This little bit of lift will help eliminate "planer snipe", which is when the board hits the back infeed roller on the way in or leaves the front infeed roller on the way out. This change in pressure causes the board to jump and the blades cut a dip into the board surface. As long as you lift the far end of the board either by hand or by inclining the tables, then you won't have this problem....most of the time.

I use the DeWalt bench planer and it works great. Don't mess with sharpening your own blades. Get an extra set and have a tool store or professional sharpen the blades. Changing blades on any planer can be dangerous...they can cut deep, even when dull. Cover the blades with a rag when tightening or loosening the bolts. Make sure they are set exactly to the same height...read the manual for instructions. I have also used a Porta Cable and a Ridgid planer. I lean toward the DeWalt.

For small shop use, the bench top models are plenty good. Big floor models are permanent fixtures...you can't move them around. We had a 30" Buss planer in our furniture shop. It sounded like a drag racer when a wide board went through it.
 
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