Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thanks to an influx of cash from uncle sam I'm thinking about investing in a jointer and was needing some advice. Using my hand plane for all jointing is getting a little old. I'd like to spend less than $1,000 but also want to avoid buying wimpy equipment in the name of saving a little cash. I've looked at a few grizzly jointers and it seems better than what wood craft is offering. I've also been looking over craigs list but am not sure if buying a used jointer is a good idea or not. Has anyone had good/bad experiences with used jointers? Should I juts buy new? What should I look for in a new/used one, besides the obvious surfaces being flat and perpendicular?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
There is absolutely nothing wrong with the Grizzly models. There is also nothing wrong with buying a used one. The table/fence surfaces are a consideration, mechanically there isn't much to them...only a cutterhead being driven by a motor. Be more cautious of the parallelogram models if you buy used. Those can be screwed up if someone dis assembled it and didn't get it back together quite right. I would suggest you consider an 8", and longer tables are better. The dovetail style jointers have been around a long time and work really well, personally I wouldn't buy a parallelogram if I had to pay extra. The thing that's most important is the tables be aligned on the same plane, I did have a 6" that when you moved infeed table, it actually shifted out of plane slightly. You can joint a board a few times and quickly see if the tables are on the same plane...
 

·
SS user
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
An 8" jointer's longer tables are a plus, but I've gotten by with a 6" and out feed support for 35 years. I flatten with a sled and planer and, joint edges only, so 6" is fine for me.
Fred is right on with his advice about parallelogram models. Who needs the extra hassle?
As to brands, I can't help. Mines a 35 year old Craftsman.
 

·
Tool Fanactic
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
I picked up a 16" JA Fay & Egan for 800 bucks, built in 1942.

I have a 12" Sidney I am working on to resell that I had 100 bucks in.

I picked up a 20" JA F&E for 200 bucks.

The tables weigh more then a grizzly.

If you have room for a 12" machine they seem to go for the same or less then an 8".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
I am going to be looking at a used older grizzly 6" inch jointer later today. I talked with a Grizzly tech who said be sure the infeed and outfeed tables are parallel. I wonder what the tolerances are for that sort of thing. By that I mean if each table is roughly 24 inches in length, would .010 out of parallel be too much? Or?? I guess a straight edge and a feeler gauge are the best I can do. Any techs out there?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
I am going to be looking at a used older grizzly 6" inch jointer later today. I talked with a Grizzly tech who said be sure the infeed and outfeed tables are parallel. I wonder what the tolerances are for that sort of thing. By that I mean if each table is roughly 24 inches in length, would .010 out of parallel be too much? Or?? I guess a straight edge and a feeler gauge are the best I can do. Any techs out there?
The detail you need to ask is whether the infeed and outfeed tables can be adjusted for parallel or just one, e.g., the infeed. The ability to adjust both is preferred.

I have a Delta 37-190 6in jointer, a Taiwanese design sold by many companies including Grizzly at one point. Long since discontinued by Delta.

My unit allow adjusting gibb screws on both infeed and outfeed tables.

I would not worry if the tables are not parallel when you purchase the machine as long as you are able to adjust to get the tables to be parallel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Thank you! I will certainly know a lot more after I own one of these things then before. The good news is the seller is asking $100 and he says there are new knives installed. I can't get hurt too badly it seems.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
The good news is the seller is asking $100 and he says there are new knives installed. I can't get hurt too badly it seems.
Having new knives is good, but it also means the screws to lock and adjust the knives should be easily adjusted.

If the environment where the machine is installed is high in moisture, the screws which lock the knives can rust in place, and these are a major PITA to remove if they are rusted

When you get the machines, it will be worth re-tuning for tables to be parallel, knives to be at the height of the outfeed table and the fence to be 90 deg to the tables. It is common for something to not be perfectly in tune.

My fence out-of-the-factory was askew. I checked it was 90 deg at the infeed end and foolishly assumed it would be 90 deg at the other end. Bad assumption. After some period of getting twisted boards I re-checked and found the problem. I was able to adjust the fence so both ends were 90 deg, but lesson learned to check and not assume.

Re-checking and setting the knives is good practice. The knives will dull over time. They are easily sharpened, but then you have to know how to set the height. So at some point this is a detail you will need to master.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
I have my eye on the Grizzly 10" GO 675 Jointer/Planer combo. It will joint boards 10 1/4" wide and plane boards 9 3/4" wide.

It seems like the perfect compromise of size, utility, and power and doesn't take up a ton of shop space if that is an issue . 2 tools in one.


Powerful with a 2 1/2 hp. 220v0lt motor. Including shipping its a little over your budget (1249), but might be worth taking a closer look at it.
 

·
Mr.20C
Joined
·
293 Posts
Those "Combo" machines ...........it's not all it is cracked up to be, a slight PITA to go from planning to jointing. I have never owned one so I can not say this from usage but just from witnessing what needs to happen to switch from one application to the other.

Just something to consider .....


I don't know where you live but I found this,,,,
http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=131094

Also a 6" Oliver 144: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Oliver-6-Jo...601?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd092d199


B,
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,864 Posts
I have a "high end" combo Mini Max

I used it only for the wide jointer and that was very infrequently. I have other planers and jointers. It was/is a pain to switch the tables and the dust collection port back and forth. Grizzly may have worked out a better/faster solution...I donno, however, I would NOT get the 10" if you are enamored with the combo concept. I would get the 12".
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Jointer-Planer/G0633
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
I used it only for the wide jointer and that was very infrequently. I have other planers and jointers. It was/is a pain to switch the tables and the dust collection port back and forth. Grizzly may have worked out a better/faster solution...I donno, however, I would NOT get the 10" if you are enamored with the combo concept. I would get the 12".
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Jointer-Planer/G0633
That machine is a beast. Over double the stated budget though :eek:

I think one of the Mods has that 12" machine and had very good things to say about it.
 

·
Mr.20C
Joined
·
293 Posts
I, personally, would not phrase that combo Grizzly machine as being a beast......far from it......
As I have stated earlier, you have to take into consideration of having to switch between planning and joining. I have read threads about this machine and "the honest" oppinions are that it is a PITA to make the switch , but they live with it,,,,,,

The other is the "short bed length" long beds are paramount IMO with a jointer. Your total length on the jointer application is 59-1/2" , take away the gap between the 2 for the cutter head and your left with roughly 28-1/2" on the in feed and out feed tables. it is important to have a longer bed on the in feed side of a jointer so your milling comes out flat and straight.

Jointing an 8' piece of wood may be a challenge on such a short bed jointer.


After looking at the frame on that machine , it appears that is a hallow ( steel sheet construction) that the cutter head is mounted on......not good IMO.....

Look at an older American made jointer and the difference in material is vast. The entire frame is solid CI, the beds( if wedge bed) CI, the beds themselfs CI or steel , the adjustment wheels, CI or steel and the tables on most were planned, not Blanchard ground (some don't care for this meathod).

I was like a lot of you are/were ,a long-long time ago,when I used to look at machinery, the -"what's new" out there and being offered at your local dealer, weather it be your local power tool distributor or a franchise distributor....most if not all of the tools and machinery coming from a freight ship ..........

Many,many years ago I had a column I needed turned for a project I had and didn't have a lathe. So I talked to a fellow peer on where to go, He sent me to this gentleman in Springville NY (Steven),and he had a barn for a shop. I was expecting all the machines I had seen new in his shop all over the place. As soon as he opened the door to his shop I was looking at machinery I had not even known existed, all old machinery......names like Northfield,Tannawitz,JA Fay & Egan,Oliver.....all of it older machinery from the 20's to the late 60's . Write away I could tell the difference in the quality immediately ,just from looking at it. He explained to me that the quality and craftsmanship that went into these machines is something of a by gone era and would not even consider china made machinery. From that day forward my whole outlook on WW machines had changed......forever!

There were stumbling blocks I had to overcome, weight and 3ph but I can not even put into words what a feeling it is to have this machinery in my shop now, well worth every dollar I spent- and then some.


Why is the new machinery so inexpensive........? Has to do with getting a very sharp pencil and getting the most out of building a machinery with less......

I say inexpensive in relation to what a new "quality" made machinery OD the same size. EX: the chicom machinery you guys seem to like Grizzly 12" jointer http://www.grizzly.com/products/The-Ultimate-12-Jointer/G9860. Plastic knobs, plastic parts, Blanchard ground, steel sheet body construction, - claims - " Money no object" in this jointer which is a line of crap.......

Northfield : http://www.northfieldwoodworking.com/Brochures-PDF/HeavyDutyJointers.pdf. This is truly a "money no object" jointer and your going to pay for it to the rough sum of $14,824.00 and up.

The difference is vastly negligible......

So why would do some of us chase this Arn to the point of obsession.....?


You can have yourself a top of line jointer, in an entire different class as far as quality for what your paying new for the overseas machinery coming over here......it is something you have to experience for yourself.

To all of you that have the overseas machinery , I mean no disrespect , we all have our own ways and that's the way it should be, but what kills me is how some view this machinery as the "best of the best" and that is just not accurate and is far from being placed into the "quality machinery" category.

What you can get used (with quality in mind) vs new is like day and night......

JMPOV so please refrain yourself from throwing objects at me....


Thank you,


B,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I totally agree! U.S. IRON! Before I knew better I had bought some of the grizzly and jet machines and had nothing but trouble. Bad motors, improper alignment, replace bearings after short time. I have since got ride of them all and replaced with good old American made machines Except one Italian made 24" planer. The original thread was about a jointer, I bought a 12 crescent made in the late 40s. Other than table alignment when I bought it, it operates like a dream and only paid $800. Yes it is a monster at about 1200lb. But I suspect it will out last me!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top